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Stunning images of the universe - James Webb telescope


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Who else is fascinated by the images and details of the universe by the James Webb Space telescope.  The universe is so mysterious, beautiful and full of wonder.  So incredible to see the images 

This Could Be the Oldest Galaxy We’ve Ever Laid Eyes On

webb reveals cosmic cliffs glittering landscape of star birth

  • It’s possible that we can now see a galaxy as it looked just 235 million years after the Big Bang.
  • Further spectroscopic analysis will reveal more information about the stars in the earliest galaxies and give us a more accurate age for them.
  • Webb’s Cosmic Evolution Early Release Science Survey is finding many extremely old galaxies. 

 

A team in Scotland is celebrating after catching a view of what may be the farthest galaxy humans have ever seen.

University of Edinburgh researchers used the James Webb Space Telescope to spy on a corner of the early universe as it appeared only 235 million years after the Big Bang; the galaxy is an astounding 35 billion light-years away. The team is cautiously optimistic, since scientists need to fully verify galaxies’ ages with further analysis, but catching sight of stars this far away is remarkable, because the universe has been expanding ever more rapidly since the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago.

Researchers have included this galaxy, called CEERS-93316, in their study of six faraway galaxies published to the pre-print server arXiV on July 25. The work has not yet been peer-reviewed.

The galaxy appears to us in infrared light, Webb’s speciality. As light travels farther and farther distances, it stretches into the infrared portion of the visible spectrum, which means it’s no longer visible to humans. Astronomers use “redshift” to measure how much the light has stretched, indicating its age. A higher redshift indicates that the light has traveled farther, while a lower redshift means the light is closer to us. CEERS-93316 has a high redshift of 16.7, according to the team’s paper.

New, distant object discoveries have been arriving fast since Webb began its deep and wide field sky survey, called the Cosmic Evolution Early Release Science (CEERS) Survey. It’s meant to find galaxies at the oldest cosmic age possible. Along the way, researchers hope to discover how these earliest galaxies formed. Another galaxy the survey found has an impressive redshift of 14.3, appearing as it was about 280 million years after the Big Bang

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This image shows Stephan's Quintet, five galaxies in a cosmic dance, 290 million light-years away.

Stephan's Quintet was first seen 225 years ago in the constellation Pegasus.

The stunning new image of it was captured by the Webb Telescope's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI).

This mosaic was constructed from almost 1000 separate image files.

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In this image, the James Webb Space Telescope's two cameras create a never-before-seen view of a star-forming region in the Carina Nebula. The combined image reveals previously invisible areas of star birth.

"Every image is a new discovery and each will give humanity a view of the humanity that we've never seen before,'' NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said on Tuesday, rhapsodising over images showing "the formation of stars, devouring black holes".

Webb's use of the infrared light spectrum allows the telescope to see through the cosmic dust and "see light from faraway light from the corners of the universe," he said.

"We've really changed the understanding of our universe," said European Space Agency director general Josef Aschbacher.

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These images show the Southern Ring Nebula, which is sometimes called "eight-burst". About 2500 light-years away, it shows an expanding cloud of gas surrounding a dying star. A light-year is 5.8 trillion miles.

This side-by-side shows a comparison of the Southern Ring Nebula in near-infrared light (left), and mid-infrared light (right), taken by the Webb Telescope.

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The deepest view of the universe ever taken

The deepest ever infrared image of the universe ever taken, from the new NASA James Webb telescope.

The stars are distinguishable by their spiky auras. The other bright spots are all entire galaxies.

Known as Webb's First Deep Field, this image of galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 is overflowing with detail. Thousands of galaxies – including the faintest objects ever observed in the infrared – have appeared in Webb's view for the first time. This slice of the vast universe covers a patch of sky approximately the size of a grain of sand held at arm's length by someone on the ground.

The deepest view of the universe ever taken

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Huge solar flare captured by NASA in stunning new image

"Our Sun has been a little extra over the last two weeks."

Those were the words from space agency NASA as they shared a photo of a magnificent solar flare captured on April 30. It can be seen in the upper right portion of this image.

Over the past two weeks five "moderate to strong" flares have been recorded.

Huge solar flare captured by NASA in stunning new image

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They're amazing pics.

I love space and astronomy stuff!

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nothing more fascinating and intriguing than the mysteries of space.. also glad we're at a point now where people don't say you're delusional anymore for speculating that we're clearly not alone! For anyone else who's into this, I recommend the movies Europa Report, doc "a journey through the universe" (it's for free on youtube) and Sunshine for the visuals and lovely eerie vibes!

thanks for sharing these wonderful images @Jazzy Jan

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21 hours ago, Nikki said:

nothing more fascinating and intriguing than the mysteries of space.. also glad we're at a point now where people don't say you're delusional anymore for speculating that we're clearly not alone! For anyone else who's into this, I recommend the movies Europa Report, doc "a journey through the universe" (it's for free on youtube) and Sunshine for the visuals and lovely eerie vibes!

thanks for sharing these wonderful images @Jazzy Jan

Amazing movie, with a romanian actress, btw.

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 Nasa and its partners on the James Webb Space Telescope have shared more spectacular images from the observatory. This time around, they provided a fresh look at the Cartwheel Galaxy, which Hubble and other telescopes previously observed. NASA said JWST has been able to reveal new details about both star formation and the black hole at the center of the galaxy, which is around 500 million light years from Earth.

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The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has taken a new image of the most distant individual star ever seen at nearly 28 billion light years away. At such enormous distances, we can usually only make out entire galaxies, but a lucky coincidence has allowed researchers to spot this star, called Earendel, with the Hubble Space Telescope and then observe it again with JWST on 30 July.

Earendel – which means “morning star” or “rising light” – resides in a galaxy called the Sunrise Arc. It is so named because its light has been stretched into a long curve by the gravity of a galaxy cluster closer to Earth in a process called gravitational lensing. This process also magnified the galaxy by a factor of more than 1000, allowing astronomers to confirm with JWST that Earendel is an individual star and not a cluster of hundreds.

Webb telescope glimpses most distant star known to exist

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Just absolutely amazing @Jazzy Jan. I follow the NASA on Instagram. It’s just incredible all the wonderful pics they post. And I swear, you can see by the likes, it’s one of the few things that is universally loved. ❤️❤️

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11 minutes ago, runa said:

Just absolutely amazing @Jazzy Jan. I follow the NASA on Instagram. It’s just incredible all the wonderful pics they post. And I swear, you can see by the likes, it’s one of the few things that is universally loved. ❤️❤️

Yes,  the NASA pictures are beautiful and something everyone can appreciate. 

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2 hours ago, Jazzy Jan said:

@nightcutter @Nikki @acko @Mattress @zephyralexxx  Glad you like the pictures.   I find them fascinating.  Looking at these pictures make me strangely emotional.  

same.. I often tear up, just thinking about how vast the universe is, all what we don't know, how insignificant we are, and how everything one day will be lost, forgotten forever.. 

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I was always fascinated by this, but became even more fascinated since 2005 when I saw how sunrise and sunset looks on Mars captured by NASA's Spirit Mars rover.

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I even applied on a NASA archive job but it was impossible when there was only 1 job in the whole world at that time :lol:

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  • 5 weeks later...

I hope Artemis launches today. I'll be watching. I love outer space shit!

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James Webb Telescope captures detailed new images of stars being born in Tarantula Nebula

A spectacular picture of space shows a cluster of stars surrounded by giant swirling clouds of gas and dust.

NASA has released two spectacular new images of the Tarantula Nebula taken by the James Webb Telescope, shedding light on a nearby region of the universe that could give astronomers new insight into how stars are formed.

 

The Tarantula Nebula, officially known as 30 Doradus, is in the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy, a stone's throw away from Earth at a mere 161,000 light-years and part of the Local Group of galaxies closest to the Milky Way.

Previous images taken of the nebula have shown it with long clouds of dust and gas appearing to emanate from its centre like a web, resulting in its spidery nickname.

But the new images, produced using the James Webb Telescope's infrared sensors, provide a more complex and detailed picture of what is happening at the nebula's centre, where stars are born at a furious pace.

The first image, taken with the telescope's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam), covers an area 340 light years across, and shows a cluster of massive stars making space for themselves at the nebula's centre by eroding the surrounding matter with what NASA labelled "blistering radiation"

Smaller points of light visible in the gas and dust clouds are "protostars", young stars that are still gaining mass as they emerge from the nebula's "web" and take their place at its centre.

The protostars have never been photographed before, as the surrounding matter is too dense for visible light to travel through.

A second image released by NASA, taken with the telescope's Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), gives the region a whole new look, with the cooler gas and dust glowing blue but the hot stars fading into the background.

A vibrant, colourful image of a star cluster in a nebula full of stars, gas and cosmic dust.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I watched a doc recently about Earth's history and again I wondered, all of these progress that we made through thousands of years as humans could easily be wiped out with one wayward meteor, just like how the Dinos were wiped out. It takes millions of years in between to happen but one day it will. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

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