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No Health Benefits From Flossing?

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I really don't care if its true or not. For me flossing is boring waste of time. Id rather get 5 minuets of extra sleep in the morning. :lol:

HOLMDEL, N.J. (AP) — It's one of the most universal recommendations in all of public health: Floss daily to prevent gum disease and cavities.

Except there's little proof that flossing works.

Still, the federal government, dental organizations and manufacturers of floss have pushed the practice for decades. Dentists provide samples to their patients; the American Dental Association insists on its website that, "Flossing is an essential part of taking care of your teeth and gums."

The federal government has recommended flossing since 1979, first in a surgeon general's report and later in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans issued every five years. The guidelines must be based on scientific evidence, under the law.

Last year, the Associated Press asked the departments of Health and Human Services and Agriculture for their evidence, and followed up with written requests under the Freedom of Information Act.

When the federal government issued its latest dietary guidelines this year, the flossing recommendation had been removed, without notice. In a letter to the AP, the government acknowledged the effectiveness of flossing had never been researched, as required.

The AP looked at the most rigorous research conducted over the past decade, focusing on 25 studies that generally compared the use of a toothbrush with the combination of toothbrushes and floss. The findings? The evidence for flossing is "weak, very unreliable," of "very low" quality, and carries "a moderate to large potential for bias."

"The majority of available studies fail to demonstrate that flossing is generally effective in plaque removal," said one review conducted last year. Another 2015 review cites "inconsistent/weak evidence" for flossing and a "lack of efficacy."

One study review in 2011 did credit floss with a slight reduction in gum inflammation — which can sometimes develop over time into full-fledged gum disease. However, the reviewers ranked the evidence as "very unreliable." A commentary in a dental magazine stated that any benefit would be so minute it might not be noticed by users.

The two leading professional groups — the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Periodontology, for specialists in gum disease and implants — cited other studies as proof of their claims that flossing prevents buildup of gunk known as plaque, early gum inflammation called gingivitis, and tooth decay. However, most of these studies used outdated methods or tested few people. Some lasted only two weeks, far too brief for a cavity or dental disease to develop. One tested 25 people after only a single use of floss. Such research, like the reviewed studies, focused on warning signs like bleeding and inflammation, barely dealing with gum disease or cavities.

Wayne Aldredge, president of the periodontists' group, acknowledged the weak scientific evidence and the brief duration of many studies. In an interview at his private practice in New Jersey, he said that the impact of floss might be clearer if researchers focused on patients at the highest risk of gum disease, such as diabetics and smokers.

Still, he urges his patients to floss to help avoid gum disease. "It's like building a house and not painting two sides of it," he said. "Ultimately those two sides are going to rot away quicker."

Aldredge also said many people use floss incorrectly, moving it in a sawing motion instead of up and down the sides of the teeth. Pressed about the origins of his organization's endorsement of flossing, he said it may simply have "taken the ADA's lead."

When the ADA was asked for proof of its claim that flossing helps prevent early gum disease and cavities, the group cited the 2011 review and a 2008 two-week study that measured bacteria and did not even consider gum disease.

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In a later statement to the AP, the ADA said flossing "removes plaque" and "is proven to help remove" debris from between teeth. A video on its website proclaims that flossing "helps prevent gum disease." When pressed, Matthew J. Messina, a practicing dentist and spokesman for the dental association, acknowledged weak evidence, but he blamed research participants who didn't floss correctly.

Even companies with a big market share of the flossing business — by next year, the global market is predicted to reach almost $2 billion, with half in the United States, according to publisher

MarketSizeInfo.com — struggled to provide convincing evidence of their claims that floss reduces plaque or gingivitis. Yet the industry has paid for most studies and sometimes designed and conducted the research.

Procter & Gamble, which claims that its floss fights plaque and gingivitis, pointed to a two-week study, which was discounted as irrelevant in the 2011 research review.

Johnson & Johnson spokesman Marc Boston said floss helps remove plaque. When the AP sent him a list of contradicting studies, he declined comment.

The floss-making companies partner with the ADA through its Seal of Acceptance program. The ADA promotes the seal to companies as something that "directly affects the purchase decisions of consumers;" each manufacturer is charged $14,500 for the evaluation. If it approves the product, the ADA then charges an additional annual fee of $3,500.

The ADA says it rigorously evaluates products and makes no profit from the program. However, floss companies themselves are allowed to design the studies.

"The funding can come from companies — no problem at all," said dentist Marcelo W.B. Araujo, vice president of the ADA's Science Institute, who joined the organization after serving as an executive for Johnson & Johnson. "The design can start from the company."

When flossing first gained acceptance, no proof was required of remedies. Dentist Levi Spear Parmly is credited with inventing floss in the early 19th century. By the time the first floss patent was issued, in 1874, the applicant noted that dentists were widely recommending its use.

The ADA has been promoting floss universally since 1908. "They just looked into what they did every day in their clinical practice and what they would recommend for patients," said Araujo.

Count dentist Damien Walmsley, scientific adviser to the British Dental Association, among the skeptics. "It's important to tell people to do the basics. Flossing is not part of the basics."

Floss can occasionally cause harm. Careless flossing can damage gums, teeth and dental work. Though frequency is unclear, floss can dislodge bad bacteria that invade the bloodstream and cause dangerous infections, especially in people with weak immunity, according to the medical literature.

National Institutes of Health dentist Tim Iafolla acknowledged that if the highest standards of science were applied in keeping with the flossing reviews of the past decade, "then it would be appropriate to drop the floss guidelines."

Regardless, he added, Americans should still floss.

"It's low risk, low cost," he said. "We know there's a possibility that it works, so we feel comfortable telling people to go ahead and do it."

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I cannot STAND the feeling of food between my teeth!!! I have to floss!!!!

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Ai Papi Si., on 07 Aug 2016 - 12:24 AM, said:

I dont care what the study says. Not flossing is kinda gross. Sorry Skin :lol:

I never do it. Just cant be assed. :lol:

Though I did start using an electric toothbrush awhile back and I have to say that has made my teeth feel smoother then ever even if it does sound like you are using a vibrator on yourself in the bathroom.

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I remember years ago when I went to the dentist for a cleaning this chick murdered my gums while flossing. She went at it like a mad woman. My gums were throbbing with pain for the rest of the day feeling like they were sliced with razor blades.

Lucky I never had her or saw her again.

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If you're not used to flossing, you will feel pain when you actually do it, even bleeding. But after repeated flossing, hardly anymore pain or bleeding.

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moniquearis, on 07 Aug 2016 - 12:39 AM, said:moniquearis, on 07 Aug 2016 - 12:39 AM, said:

If you're not used to flossing, you will feel pain when you actually do it, even bleeding. But after repeated flossing, hardly anymore pain or bleeding.

I have always gotten flossed over the years when going for cleanings and never had an issue. This woman was just a special kind of case.

I am just glad I didn't get my dad's or sisters genes when it comes to my teeth. My poor sister is going through hell with hers but that is another whole story.

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The only flossing that skin likes is when wearing thongs

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Oil pulling is a healthy alternative to flossing.

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Guest Rachelle of London

Oil pulling is a healthy alternative to flossing.

Yeah. I do oil pulling but I do floss in the evenings too. I HATE feeling food in my teeth. It's the WORST

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Flossing is very important my dentist told me that especially when i have braces now

And also brushing the tongue.

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I got pulling stuff too but it takes ages. I want one of those blowy things (no comments from Chelle or Vande thanks).

Its been on TV here, the dentist said yes to do it, if you are doing it right or you can cause more damage for its worth. Its best to use those mini brushy poker things (incidentals?) . Ive got those too if I feel like I need it. Blowy things are the future.

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Guest Rachelle of London

Barney! Stay away from blowie things

:dead:

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flossing takes 30 seconds, what's the big deal? I love that it's a scandal how there's no studies proving that to remove food from between teeth prevents dental problems. It's just common sense. Soon there'll be a study proving that sitting a spell relaxes the body after it has been in the standing position for hours. :lmao:

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Barney! Stay away from blowie things

:dead:

:boring:

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I didn't floss for a week. Honestly, it was fucking disgusting.

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I have to floss daily.

I hate having food stuck in between my teeth!

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I honestly don't get food stuck between my teeth.

Maybe because they are so close together? I mean I am sure bacteria is obviously there but I would rather just hopefully kill as much of that by burning my mouth with Listerine for a bit.

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spazz, on 07 Aug 2016 - 09:39 AM, said:

And also brushing the tongue.

Bushing the tongue is essential. From what I heard that's where most of bad breath comes from, though they are constantly changing the rules so who knows if that's even true.

And I hope none of you acting as if not flossing is so gross aren't smokers. Nothing is worse for your mouth and gives you swamp ass breath more then that. :lol:

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I regularly pull out chunks of food and debris when I floss, so I am not stopping the practice. I don't want rotting food festering in between my teeth. Honestly, ever since I started flossing years ago, I no longer get those huge cavities in between my molars.

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Guest Rachelle of London

I honestly don't get food stuck between my teeth.

Maybe because they are so close together? I mean I am sure bacteria is obviously there but I would rather just hopefully kill as much of that by burning my mouth with Listerine for a bit.

Do you do oil pulling? It's good if you don't like flossing.

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The Black Madonna, on 07 Aug 2016 - 5:49 PM, said:

Do you do oil pulling? It's good if you don't like flossing.

I never heard of it. What is it?

Also it is RARE as hell if I brush my teeth before bed.

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Guest Rachelle of London

I never heard of it. What is it?

Also it is RARE as hell if I brush my teeth before bed.

Basically you take a tablespoon of oil. You can use olive oil, coconut oil whatever, I use olive oil. Pop it in your mouth and swish it around like mouthwash for 10 mins. Basically it draws out all the toxins from your body and the oil will remove any debris that's in your mouth. You don't do it everyday but even if you do it once a week you'll notice a difference. When you spit out you literally see all the nastiness you have in your mouth. It has great health benefits. Look it up. People don't realise how much we hold in our mouths and how it friggs up our bodies. Apparently it's also a good hangover cure too.

Look it up skin. It's really interesting.

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The Black Madonna, on 07 Aug 2016 - 5:58 PM, said:

Basically you take a tablespoon of oil. You can use olive oil, coconut oil whatever, I use olive oil. Pop it in your mouth and swish it around like mouthwash for 10 mins. Basically it draws out all the toxins from your body and the oil will remove any debris that's in your mouth. You don't do it everyday but even if you do it once a week you'll notice a difference. When you spit out you literally see all the nastiness you have in your mouth. It has great health benefits. Look it up. People don't realise how much we hold in our mouths and how it friggs up our bodies. Apparently it's also a good hangover cure too.

Look it up skin. It's really interesting.

I'll give it a try.

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Swishing some olive oil right now. :lmao:

Don't have coconut oil. Sure that tastes much better.

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Guest

I love to floss. It feels good.

I take a long time flossing.

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Oil pulling is a healthy alternative to flossing.

I floss and use coconut oil for 'pulling'.

CO is antibacterial/ antimicrobial

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Guest Rachelle of London

I floss and use coconut oil for 'pulling'.

Same. I do both. I use olive oil though.

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