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HOUSTON - November 16 - PRESS Reports/Reviews/Pics


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got over 100 signs printed and being shipped to TX as we speak!! lol i cant have any extra weight in my bags as i'm continuing on after to the Detroit show!!

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Guest mirwais72

I wonder if she would fly in tomorrow. She has a few days off. You know she does her Kabbalah visits in NYC on Friday evenings and Saturday morning. She might just fly in Saturday. Honestly, I don't anticipate her spending much time here but who knows.

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I wonder if she would fly in tomorrow. She has a few days off. You know she does her Kabbalah visits in NYC on Friday evenings and Saturday morning. She might just fly in Saturday. Honestly, I don't anticipate her spending much time here but who knows.

Oy I forgot about Kabblahblah. Yep, she might fly to LA after the show tonight and fly to Houston on Saturday. In fact, I bet that is exactly what she does.

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In the "Preview" section of the Houston Chronicle, which previews weekend events( Fri-Sun) such as concerts and what not, DID NOT EVEN MENTION Madonna. Even under "Sunday, Nov 16"- NOTHING.

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This is what they have online :(

http://www.chron.com/life/photogallery/Hot...usethisone.html (number 12)

Through force of will Madonna remains an enduring pop icon, which is remarkable seeing as she peaked more than two decades ago. But she's a mother of reinvention, which is a great way to hide second-tier albums, which her latest, Hard Candy, definitely is. Her shows remain entertaining, though, in a flashy, Rocky Horror kind of way. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 16 at Minute Maid Park, 501 Crawford. Tickets are $55-$350; 713-629-3700 or ticketmaster.com.

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This is what they have online :(

http://www.chron.com/life/photogallery/Hot...usethisone.html (number 12)

Through force of will Madonna remains an enduring pop icon, which is remarkable seeing as she peaked more than two decades ago. But she's a mother of reinvention, which is a great way to hide second-tier albums, which her latest, Hard Candy, definitely is. Her shows remain entertaining, though, in a flashy, Rocky Horror kind of way. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 16 at Minute Maid Park, 501 Crawford. Tickets are $55-$350; 713-629-3700 or ticketmaster.com.

That wasn't Joey Guerra writing that. He will be all up her ass praising her.

But good GOD the person who wrote that is an idiot.

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This is what they have online :(

http://www.chron.com/life/photogallery/Hot...usethisone.html (number 12)

Through force of will Madonna remains an enduring pop icon, which is remarkable seeing as she peaked more than two decades ago. But she's a mother of reinvention, which is a great way to hide second-tier albums, which her latest, Hard Candy, definitely is. Her shows remain entertaining, though, in a flashy, Rocky Horror kind of way. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 16 at Minute Maid Park, 501 Crawford. Tickets are $55-$350; 713-629-3700 or ticketmaster.com.

WOW

WHAT THE FUCK!!!

Who the fuck is this idiot who wrote that?!?!?

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Guest mirwais72
WOW

WHAT THE FUCK!!!

Who the fuck is this idiot who wrote that?!?!?

Are you surprised? I'm not. People have written the ugliest things about her for 25 years. Who the fuck cares! I am surprised they wrote anything at all.

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FINALLY

Is Madonna relevant? NO!

By CLIFFORD PUGH Houston Chronicle

Nov. 14, 2008, 1:07PMShare Print Email Del.icio.usDiggTechnoratiYahoo! Buzz

The last time Madonna performed in Houston, Manuel Olivo camped out overnight in front of a Clear Lake record shop to score a good ticket. It was 1990, and the Bayou City was the first stop on the superstar's Blonde Ambition tour.

``It will be the biggest night of my life so far,'' the 20-year-old University of Houston student told me for an article in the Houston Post.

Olivo was mesmerized as the singer showed up at The Summit in a Jean Paul Gaultier cone bra and an I Dream of Jeannie ponytail. She opened with Express Yourself, writhed on a bed as she sang Like a Virgin and defiantly confessed her sins in Papa Don't Preach. (Note of irony: The Summit is now Lakewood Church.)

For tonight's Sticky & Sweet tour at Minute Maid Park, Olivo didn't have to stand in line to buy a ticket. He went online instead. But this time, he's not nearly as excited.

``I'm going purely for nostalgia,'' said the now 38-year-old data administrator.``I still like her, but I don't love her. She's not really that ground-breaking anymore. But I think she still has the energy to put on a great show.''

If ticket sales are the gauge, Madonna remains as popular as ever. Her Houston appearance -- the only Texas stop -- is sold out. But I suspect that many concert goers are turning out to relive their past -- and hers.

None of her recent albums have been monster hits. She hasn't jump-started a fashion trend in years. Even the tabloids don't seem as interested as they once were (although her recent split from director Guy Ritchie amped up the headlines again). She is simply another aging pop star trying to remain in vogue.

It's hard to overestimate the singer's influence on the generation that grew up in the '80s. In addition to singing often and unabashedly about sex, she challenged religion (Like a Prayer), toyed with female stereotypes (Material Girl) and promoted girl power (Express Yourself).

The controversial tunes, along with simpler songs like Holiday and Where's the Party?, all had one thing in common: You could dance to them. Back then it wasn't unusual for Houston clubs to play the same Madonna song several times in one night because it always filled the dance floor.

As the queen of MTV when it showed wall-to-wall music videos instead of reality shows, Madonna used fashion to sharpen her image. She inspired nearly every woman under 30 -- and some men -- to copy her look.

She was at her peak of influence on that balmy spring night in Houston, when MTV broadcast live from The Summit and camera crews trailed her for the 1991 documentary Truth or Dare.

Since then, she has periodically courted controversy with her 1992 book, Sex, and album, Erotica; when she shared a taboo kiss with Britney Spears at the 2003 MTV Awards; and when she adopted a Malawi orphan in 2005. But the publicity has seemed more forced each time.

Over the past decade, she has recorded a stream of well-received CDs, but nothing on Ray of Light, Music, Confessions on a Dance Floor or Hard Candy seems as catchy as her old stuff or as fresh as Rihanna's Umbrella or Beyoncé's Crazy In Love.

At 50, Madonna's body is remarkably taut from years of exercise and a sensible diet. But her face is round and full and strangely Mary-Kate Ashley-like for her age. She is rumored to have undergone a highly specialized, muscular face lift. A few more rounds of cosmetic surgery and she will veer dangerously close to a cringe-inducing caricature, like Michael Jackson or Cher.

Her ability to drive fashion seems to have left her, too. She makes eight costume changes in Sticky & Sweet, ranging from a ``pole-dancing, break-dancing cheerleader'' to a ``gypsy singer with a traveling band of minstrels,'' according to the London Daily Mail.

Top fashion designers including Gaultier, Miu Miu, Givenchy, Stella McCartney, Yves Saint Laurent and Moschino contributed to the show. But none of the looks -- including high-cut leotards, leather stiletto boots, fishnet hose and a white silk top hat -- are likely to be copied by anyone other than drag queens. And do we really need to see her in knee-highs and red satin shorts doing the double-dutch jump?

While more than half of the songs she'll perform in Houston will come from Hard Candy, I bet the audience will be more excited over the old stuff, like Vogue, Into the Groove, Borderline and Like A Prayer.

Of course, Madonna has always been the mother of reinvention. Over the years, she has morphed from boy toy to material girl to sophisticated temptress to urban disco queen. She's been a Kaballah adherent, a humanitarian, a lady of the manor with a faux British accent. And she's now a soon-to-be single girl. So who's to say she can't make herself relevant again?

All it might take to make it happen is a hit tune and a fling with A-Rod.

clifford.pugh@chron.com

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I told ya Joey would come through......

Is Madonna still relevant? YES!

By JOEY GUERRA Houston Chronicle

Nov. 14, 2008, 12:40PM

Ethan Miller Getty Images

Madonna "remains a powerful music figure," says fan Melissa Martinez. "Her stuff just isn't boring."

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Resources

Madonna

When: 7:30 tonight (Nov. 16)

Where: Minute Maid Park, 501 Park

Tickets: $55-$350; sold out

Party until you're sticky

Wondering where to get in the groove this Madonna weekend? Tonight it's actually cool to show off your Vogue skills, so be prepared to strike a pose at pre- and post- Sticky & Sweet concert parties.

The Alden Hotel is ground zero for Madonna mania. The pre-party on the second floor veranda includes a lookalike contest, complimentary cocktails and light bites. Minute Maid Park is four blocks away. Tickets are $20 at the door. 1117 Prairie, 832-200-8800.

Lucky's Pub, another sweet spot for true blue fans, is also just a dance step or two from the concert venue. Mix 96.5 hosts a party in the Hard Candy Lounge with lookalike contests, name that Madonna music, Madonna karaoke and free shuttle service to Minute Maid Park and back. Show your concert ticket for food and drink specials. 801 St. Emanuel, 713-522-2010.

Long after her Madgesty takes her last bow, the party continues at South Beach. Famous for its tribute nights, the Madonna-ista post-concert party is free with a concert ticket and features drink specials. 810 Pacific, 713-529-7623.

Here's the thing: Madonna is no nostalgia act.

Fans love Holiday and Like a Virgin and Papa Don't Preach. We look back fondly on Desperately Seeking Susan. We'll bust out the Immaculate Collection during house cleaning

But Madonna love isn't fixated in the past. It follows her smirky disco groove into the future.

``Her music is still relevant today. She manages to change up and stay with what's current, but it still has her flare -- that Madonna signature,'' says local fan Melissa Martinez, 36, who has seen Madonna perform only recently in Ft. Lauderdale (2004) and in Las Vegas (2006).

Currently bumping in Martinez's car? Hard Candy and Confessions on a Dance Floor. No retro trips for her.

``She's been around for so long but remains such a powerful music figure, at least in my world. Her stuff just isn't boring.''

Hard Candy, Madonna's 11th studio album, sold 280,000 copies its first week of release, big numbers for any artist in 2008. The disc's first single, 4 Minutes, was her biggest hit since 2000's Don't Tell Me. She was named 2008's best-selling American artist during this month's World Music Awards in Monte Carlo, in recognition for Hard Candy's global sales, which are at 3 million and counting.

Madonna herself is rarely interested in looking back. Her current Sticky & Sweet tour includes only a trio of songs -- Into the Groove, Borderline, La Isla Bonita -- that could truly be considered retro, and they've been radically reworked. She's done the same thing on previous tours.

Her influence can be seen in numerous younger stars, from Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera to Gwen Stefani and Fergie. Even Miley Cyrus has taken a few tips.

Instead of becoming a vintage diva, Madonna has pulled ahead of her '80s peers. Prince can still be fierce on stage, but his albums have been uneven. Michael Jackson and Whitney Houston both crashed and burned.

``It's hard for me to even wrap my brain around how anyone could think the Sticky & Sweet tour is nostalgic. Madonna is constantly reinventing,'' says Frank Saenz, 32, a former Houstonian who saw Madonna earlier this month in Las Vegas.

Though she was already a fashion icon and a controversial flashpoint, Madonna hit her musical stride with 1989's Like a Prayer, an emotionally charged collection of mature pop anthems. It made her previous albums seem like the shallow musings of a naughty schoolgirl.

More growth followed on 1992's underrated Erotica, a sexually charged companion to her Sex book; and 1994's Bedtime Stories, which laced pop melodies with lush R&B arrangements.

But to this listener, Madonna's creative peak was 1998's Ray of Light, a trancey, electronic opus that was the result of her vocal training for Evita and her inspired collaborations with producer William Orbit.

A decade later it's still an astonishing, fluid record, and the title track is an unmatched blast of pop euphoria.

Music came two years later and re-established Madonna's pop muscle. The title track and Don't Tell Me were radio hits. The disc played like a friskier companion to Ray of Light. And Madonna still proved to be a firestarter. The video for contemplative single What It Feels Like for a Girl was relegated to late-night airings because of its violent imagery.

American Life's aggressive rants and anti-war sentiments caused controversy in 2004. The title track's original, George W. Bush-bashing clip was pulled from TV. It's all on-point today -- another example, perhaps, of Madonna being ahead of her time. Dance fans took to the disc, and eight of its tracks became club hits, including the frenetic Nobody Knows Me.

``Madonna has always been a reflection of contemporary music,'' says Rich Pangilinan, known in club circles as DJ Riddler. He's remixed tunes for Mariah Carey, Janet Jackson, Kelly Clarkson and Pink.

Pangilinan sees Madonna as still atop the pack.

``Madonna has always had the support of the club scene, which has traditionally been a youth-oriented market,'' he says. ``She came from the club scene and recognizes the importance of the DJs and club patrons.''

Confessions on a Dance Floor felt like a thank-you to fans who had stuck by Madonna through all the ballads and detours. It was a nonstop mix of disco shimmer and electro-pop dazzle.

Of course, I have my Madonna memories. They're tied to actual events more than songs. Engaging in Madonna vs. Whitney debates with family. The patchouli-scented Like a Prayer cassette. (Cassette!) Attending the Blonde Ambition Tour at the Summit and bragging to awestruck high-school friends.

Begging my father to take me to Town & Country Mall for a quickly vanishing copy of the Sex book. Scouring record stores and Web sites for hard-to-find remixes of Buenos Aires. (I found them.) Traveling to Las Vegas and D.C. for tours that bypassed Texas.

And, for the past four years, dancing all night long during the Madonnarama events at South Beach Nightclub.

This year's Hard Candy finds Madonna still ready to boogie, though the disco flourishes don't feel as immediate as her previous albums. But the disc's not a wash. Give It 2 Me and Heartbeat are standouts, along with She's Not Me, a toot-toot homage to Donna Summer's Bad Girls that finds our diva stating her case.

``She's not me/She doesn't have my name,'' she sings. ``She'll never have what I have/It won't be the same.''

Indeed. Many have tried, but few are, well, Madonna.

joey.guerra@chron.com

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Madonna: fashion chameleon

By JOY SEWING Houston Chronicle

Nov. 14, 2008, 12:11PM1 2

Associated Press

Madonna performs Like a Virgin in 1985 . . .

Madonna, who turned 50 in August, is a fashion wild card.

You never know what she's going to wear next.

``She's done things that have never been done before,'' said Evelyn Gorman, a Madonna fan who formerly owned an exclusive Houston clothing boutique. ``She's challenged the boundaries of what is considered acceptable. She's tweaked a nerve across the board. In many ways, she gave us permission to be different, to be exposed and to be wild at heart and feel good about it.''

Fans have followed the Material Girl's transformation from a sexually charged rebel schoolgirl (Like a Virgin, 1984) to a Marilyn Monroe lookalike (Dick Tracy, 1990) to a glitzy dominatrix (Blonde Ambition Tour, 1990) to an Eva Peron lookalike (Evita, 1996) to a Kabbalah convert (Ray of Light, 1998) to a geisha (Nothing Really Matters video, 1998) to a disco queen (Confessions on a Dance Floor, 2005).

This time around, she's simultaneously channeling Fred Astaire (the top hat) and Bob Fosse (the high-cut leotard).

``She could walk out in a paper bag, and people would go crazy,'' says Chris America, a Washington, D.C.-based performer who's impersonated the superstar for almost 25 years. ``Madonna has an infinite number of looks. She has something going for her, then she changes. She's good at adapting.''

Some fans say the singer has softened her style both on and off stage.

There was nothing outlandish in the track suits, dresses and trench coats sold under the M by Madonna label last year by the Swedish discount retailer H&M, with stores throughout the United States.

At various appearances during the Cannes Film Festival last spring, the star showed a penchant for designer elegance. Her wardrobe included a conservative, high-necked silk dress by Stella McCartney and a splashy, sequined Chanel gown. She also exuded glamour at last year's Vanity Fair after-party in a black Dolce & Gabbana gown reportedly accessorized with $10 million worth of diamonds.

But Madonna still has the power to offend. When she wore a pair of Chanel shoes with pistol-shaped heels recently, the anti-gun contingent balked.

Many fans say the star's chameleonlike ability is part of her allure.

``Madonna is always re-inventing herself,'' says Houston hostess Rachel Brown, who gave a dinner here for Madonna's brother, Christopher Ciccone, a few weeks ago.

No matter what she's wearing, what's underneath seems only to have improved. The Sticky & Sweet costumes show off a chiseled body that looks, by some standards, more thirtysomething than 50.

``She has this super-hero body,'' America said. ``She's so sculpted she looks almost like a cartoon. It's hard to keep up with her physically. I'm in the gym all the time.''

joy.sewing@chron.com

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FINALLY

Is Madonna relevant? NO!

By CLIFFORD PUGH Houston Chronicle

Nov. 14, 2008, 1:07PMShare Print Email Del.icio.usDiggTechnoratiYahoo! Buzz

The last time Madonna performed in Houston, Manuel Olivo camped out overnight in front of a Clear Lake record shop to score a good ticket. It was 1990, and the Bayou City was the first stop on the superstar's Blonde Ambition tour.

``It will be the biggest night of my life so far,'' the 20-year-old University of Houston student told me for an article in the Houston Post.

Olivo was mesmerized as the singer showed up at The Summit in a Jean Paul Gaultier cone bra and an I Dream of Jeannie ponytail. She opened with Express Yourself, writhed on a bed as she sang Like a Virgin and defiantly confessed her sins in Papa Don't Preach. (Note of irony: The Summit is now Lakewood Church.)

For tonight's Sticky & Sweet tour at Minute Maid Park, Olivo didn't have to stand in line to buy a ticket. He went online instead. But this time, he's not nearly as excited.

``I'm going purely for nostalgia,'' said the now 38-year-old data administrator.``I still like her, but I don't love her. She's not really that ground-breaking anymore. But I think she still has the energy to put on a great show.''

If ticket sales are the gauge, Madonna remains as popular as ever. Her Houston appearance -- the only Texas stop -- is sold out. But I suspect that many concert goers are turning out to relive their past -- and hers.

None of her recent albums have been monster hits. She hasn't jump-started a fashion trend in years. Even the tabloids don't seem as interested as they once were (although her recent split from director Guy Ritchie amped up the headlines again). She is simply another aging pop star trying to remain in vogue.

It's hard to overestimate the singer's influence on the generation that grew up in the '80s. In addition to singing often and unabashedly about sex, she challenged religion (Like a Prayer), toyed with female stereotypes (Material Girl) and promoted girl power (Express Yourself).

The controversial tunes, along with simpler songs like Holiday and Where's the Party?, all had one thing in common: You could dance to them. Back then it wasn't unusual for Houston clubs to play the same Madonna song several times in one night because it always filled the dance floor.

As the queen of MTV when it showed wall-to-wall music videos instead of reality shows, Madonna used fashion to sharpen her image. She inspired nearly every woman under 30 -- and some men -- to copy her look.

She was at her peak of influence on that balmy spring night in Houston, when MTV broadcast live from The Summit and camera crews trailed her for the 1991 documentary Truth or Dare.

Since then, she has periodically courted controversy with her 1992 book, Sex, and album, Erotica; when she shared a taboo kiss with Britney Spears at the 2003 MTV Awards; and when she adopted a Malawi orphan in 2005. But the publicity has seemed more forced each time.

Over the past decade, she has recorded a stream of well-received CDs, but nothing on Ray of Light, Music, Confessions on a Dance Floor or Hard Candy seems as catchy as her old stuff or as fresh as Rihanna's Umbrella or Beyoncé's Crazy In Love.

At 50, Madonna's body is remarkably taut from years of exercise and a sensible diet. But her face is round and full and strangely Mary-Kate Ashley-like for her age. She is rumored to have undergone a highly specialized, muscular face lift. A few more rounds of cosmetic surgery and she will veer dangerously close to a cringe-inducing caricature, like Michael Jackson or Cher.

Her ability to drive fashion seems to have left her, too. She makes eight costume changes in Sticky & Sweet, ranging from a ``pole-dancing, break-dancing cheerleader'' to a ``gypsy singer with a traveling band of minstrels,'' according to the London Daily Mail.

Top fashion designers including Gaultier, Miu Miu, Givenchy, Stella McCartney, Yves Saint Laurent and Moschino contributed to the show. But none of the looks -- including high-cut leotards, leather stiletto boots, fishnet hose and a white silk top hat -- are likely to be copied by anyone other than drag queens. And do we really need to see her in knee-highs and red satin shorts doing the double-dutch jump?

While more than half of the songs she'll perform in Houston will come from Hard Candy, I bet the audience will be more excited over the old stuff, like Vogue, Into the Groove, Borderline and Like A Prayer.

Of course, Madonna has always been the mother of reinvention. Over the years, she has morphed from boy toy to material girl to sophisticated temptress to urban disco queen. She's been a Kaballah adherent, a humanitarian, a lady of the manor with a faux British accent. And she's now a soon-to-be single girl. So who's to say she can't make herself relevant again?

All it might take to make it happen is a hit tune and a fling with A-Rod.

clifford.pugh@chron.com

What the FUCK?? bitter as can be

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^ are any radio stations playing her music? or giving away tickets at least

I can't remember which radio station was having a Madonna weekend. I know KRBE is doing that official party tonight and all week long they gave tickets!

I know her dancers have been here since Thursday.

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Guest Danny86
Over the past decade, she has recorded a stream of well-received CDs, but nothing on Ray of Light, Music, Confessions on a Dance Floor or Hard Candy seems as catchy as her old stuff or as fresh as Rihanna's Umbrella or Beyoncé's Crazy In Love.

:lmao: Ridiculous!

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All the Houston radio stations are having some sort of Madonna themed celebration( 96.5, 104.1, 106.9).

What exactly are they doing... Because the haven't played anything as I can see.. Just giving tickets? Especially KRBE No Madonna!

Only KODA is supporting her a lot!

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What exactly are they doing... Because the haven't played anything as I can see.. Just giving tickets? Especially KRBE No Madonna!

Only KODA is supporting her a lot!

106.9 has this fake Madonna saying "Hi Houston, its the Material Girl( as if she would say that), when you hear me, be the first caller to win tickets to my sold out show". It is sooooo obvious it isn't her.

I would be shocked if KHMX didn't play her alot. Or 106.9( they specialize in 80's music). I haven't been listening to the radio much today.

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Over the past decade, she has recorded a stream of well-received CDs, but nothing on Ray of Light, Music, Confessions on a Dance Floor or Hard Candy seems as catchy as her old stuff or as fresh as Rihanna's Umbrella or Beyoncé's Crazy In Love

BITCH PLZ :electropop:

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