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GOD

Privacy Policy Changed

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Can someone explain to me what all this privacy policies change means? All of a sudden I’m getting different emails from different places informing me about it. 

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Yes it’s so annoying. Starting from May 25th apparently something is about to change. I haven’t figured out what exactly. 

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IN general it means nothing. If you want to get your news via newsletters, than press OK

If not then press NO.

Its all about the data of your information being saved by those companies.

But it seems a more big problem for companies...but thats completley different story.

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Why now is there a new law? 

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It is a new private policy in the EU to avoid the abuse from servers from allover the world. This is something that has taken years to get and will grant rights to EU citizens. They won't use your data offshore for example and whenever you accept new privacy terms, they have to be explained VERY VERY CLEARLY and you don'¡t have to agree to it all or decline it all, you can accept several parts. 

It is a very important step into security and democracy. After the Cambridge Analytica scandal, it is clear that how our data is protected can make the difference: they influenced the Trump elections and the Brexit referendum because they profited from unprotected data. 

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The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) (EU) 2016/679 is a regulation in EU law on data protection and privacy for all individuals within the European Union and the European Economic Area. It also addresses the export of personal data outside the EU and EEA. The GDPR aims primarily to give control to citizens and residents over their personal data and to simplify the regulatory environment for international business by unifying the regulation within the EU.[1]

Superseding the Data Protection Directive, the regulation contains provisions and requirements pertaining to the processing of personally identifiable information of data subjects inside the European Union. Business processes that handle personal data must be built with privacy by design and by default, meaning that personal data must be stored using pseudonymisation or full anonymisation, and use the highest-possible privacy settings by default, so that the data is not available publicly without explicit consent, and cannot be used to identify a subject without additional information stored separately. No personal data may be processed unless it is done under a lawful basis specified by the regulation, or if the data controller or processor has received explicit, opt-in consent from the data's owner. The business must allow this permission to be withdrawn at any time.

A processor of personal data must clearly disclose what data is being collected and how, why it is being processed, how long it is being retained, and if it is being shared with any third-parties. Users have the right to request a portable copy of the data collected by a processor in a common format, and the right to have their data erased under certain circumstances. Public authorities, and businesses whose core activities centre around regular or systematic processing of personal data, are required to employ a data protection officer (DPO), who is responsible for managing compliance with the GDPR. Businesses must report any data breaches within 72 hours if they have an adverse effect on user privacy.

It was adopted on 14 April 2016,[2] and after a two-year transition period, becomes enforceable on 25 May 2018.[3][4] Because the GDPR is a regulation, not a directive, it does not require national governments to pass any enabling legislation and is directly binding and applicable.[5]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Data_Protection_Regulation

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Ok that’s like rocket science English can you simply the way you’d say it to janet’s Flicked bean?

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7 hours ago, GOD said:

Ok that’s like rocket science English can you simply the way you’d say it to janet’s Flicked bean?

A regulation (could be regarded as European law since its directly applicable throughout EU) becomes effective today. It aims to regulate all the activity of all firms/public bodies connected with personal data. All economic operators/non economic bodies in the EU (or doing businesses in EU) have to have a person dealing only with personal data who is in touch with the national body for defence of personal data (each EU state must have one). He/she is responsible that the data is operated with in accordance with the Regulation. The Regulation clearly lists the grounds when personal data can be operated with (when its enshrined in EU law, for the aims of contracts etc.). One of the grounds is when the subject of the data has agreed, but that agreement has to be explicit (thats why most ppl get the e-mails), it shouldn't  be done under pressure, he/she should know what his/her personal data is complied for etc. Regulation forbids certain sensitive personal data to be operated with (including compiled) like health data, sexual orientation data, sex life data with very hard exceptions... The firms/ public bodies must register all the personal data that they have dealt with and encrypt it and after a certain amount of time: to destroy it. Infringements of the regulation could lead to fines as big as 2 percent of the capital of the firm/body.

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thanks for that. is this because of the facebook thing? there has to be a reason behind all this

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29 minutes ago, GOD said:

thanks for that. is this because of the facebook thing? there has to be a reason behind all this

They've been working on it for several years. Data was already protected for decades but new platforms and social media meant that a new legislation was necessary. This time it is not an EU directive (that any EU country can adapt) but a regulation (it has to be transferred into national law LITERALLY). 

If a firm violates this regulation in the EU penalties are up to 20 million! 

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Europe has always been a lighthouse on citizens rights. Let's hope that the rest of the world follows

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10 hours ago, GOD said:

thanks for that. is this because of the facebook thing? there has to be a reason behind all this

I don't think so. The preparation of a regulation takes a lot of time. Such regulations are written by the European Commission then submitted to the Council of Ministers and the European Parliament for adoption. Both bodies must adopt it and if one fails to do so, there are complicated negotiations between the Parliament and the Council to reach an agreement. Apart from that, to even be considered in the Council of Ministers, more than half of the EU states with the majority of the EU population must be on board. So I am sure the process has started at least 5 years ago. The regulation was actually published in Official Journal 2 years ago but came into force today. There are articles on profiling though, which is practically what FB is doing.

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10 hours ago, GOD said:

thanks for that. is this because of the facebook thing? there has to be a reason behind all this

The reason is that the protection of personal data falls within the scope of the competence of the European Union. The protection of natural persons in relation to the processing of personal data is a fundamental right. Article 8 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union and Article 16 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union  provide that everyone has the right to the protection of personal data concerning him or her. Thus the EU is obliged to act and adopt legislation on the matter. Rapid technological developments and globalisation are cited as reasons for the adoption of the Regulation.

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