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EROTICA 25 - The Silver SEXiversary Thread (#MadonnaErotica25)

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just re-discovered my love to Thief of Heart and listening to it nonstop.

Somehow her rap part reminds me to Kenya Moores gone with wind fabolous song. I guess Kenyas song writers listend too much to Thied of heart :chuckle:

Oh and if only the Sex book would be a little bit cheaper on ebay

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"My judgement is never based on the world's reaction." - Madonna

AdBGt0e.jpg

Madonna's reflections on the Erotica era two years later (excerpted from Q Magazine, October 1994).

- - - - - - -

Q: What is the biggest disappointment of your musical career?
"The fact that my Erotica album was overlooked because of the whole thing with the Sex book. It just got lost in all that. I think there's some brilliant songs on it and people didn't give it a chance. That disappointed me, but I'm not disappointed in the record itself."

- - - - - - -

The point of Madonna is to cheer us up. Yet in America she is discussed to a phenomenal extent. She seems caught in that nation's psychic crossfire; enacting its fantasies, but also representing its innermost anxieties. Eminent authors and top academics debate her endlessly. (To read even a fraction of it can be tiring; the only known antidote is her greatest hits album, The Immaculate Collection, which offers sweet relief and a smart reminder of all that's truly important about her.)

She is used to notoriety by now, and to poor notices for her movie appearances. But even Madonna was shocked by the bashing given to her 1992 book Sex (metal-bound; much nudeness and rudity; Madge and chums in immoral frolics; one-star review in 'Q'). Many claimed that Madonna, the arch media-manipulator etc, had at last been wrong-footed. This was a new development. Previously, things didn't happen to Madonna -- she happened to them.

Now she faced condemnation from the moral fundamentalists and ridicule from elsewhere. Even though the book sold well -- and newspapers that rubbished it were careful to re-print as many pictures from it as they could -- its hyping left a poor after-taste. In all, it probably did nothing for her career.

It certainly did little for the idea that sex deserves privacy. She is for openness, believing it the opposite of ignorance; and if ignorance begets bigotry and guilt, so openness will bring happier times for all.

There is a thicket of thorny problems inside all this. You don't need to be a religious zealot to wonder if it's all quite right; the beliefs that she offends are often deeply held, and some of the skeptics are actually rather thoughtful. Is she up to the job she's taken on, or would she echo the poignant cry of Kenneth Williams, as he played the dying Julius Caesar: "Infamy! Infamy! They've all got it in for me!"

Q: For someone who is, basically, just an entertainer, you've become a battleground for debates about all kinds of things.
"Yes. Sexual politics, feminist politics..."

Q: What fame is supposed to be...
"Yeah. Well I think because I dealt with so many of those issues in my work, whether it be in 'Truth or Dare' [her 1991 'rockumentary', released in Britain under the inferior title 'In Bed With Madonna'] where I showed the inner workings of the life of a celebrity, and these are things that people always cover up... And sex, I talked about my sexual fantasies with different videos and songs. I talked about asserting your power, using everything you had, being feminine, if not feminist, being a sexual creature. My whole idea about empowering yourself is to use whatever strengths you have. To be in a man's world successfully you don't have to be like a man or dress like a man, or think like a man.

"All of these ideas went so against the grain of what you are allowed to talk about in public if you're a popular entertainer. All of a sudden it opened up the discussion, the people that were on my side, and the Moral Majority that was against me, then everyone started reviewing those opinions in the media. And it's still going strong. But I see my influences everywhere. And I'm amused by it." She laughs.

Q: Being said to cause enormous changes in society is a big gig to land on anyone, but...
"Yeah, I'll say!"

Q: But, to whatever extent, do you think you've done any good?
(Quite matter-of-factly.) "Absolutely. It's always good to provoke... a discussion, and get people to think. You cannot be an inspiration to people or a role model unless you have a point of view."

Q: Is it good or healthy to make sex such an open subject of discussion?
"Yes, absolutely. Most of our sexually delinquent behaviour is a direct result of sex being such a taboo subject, such an unspeakable thing. People keep everything inside; they're afraid to say what they feel or what they need. Something's gotta give. It's not healthy not to say what you prefer, who you are, what you desire. To live with that kind of shame has a very negative effect on people. And on society."

Q: But so many of the things that people find sexy are to do with repression. Bondage images... It's like, considered in the abstract, a nun seems a sexier thing than a sex therapist.
"Absolutely."

Q: But the one symbolizes repression of sexuality, the other is all for bringing it out in the open. How do you get around that?
"How you get around it is, that's the hypocrisy of it all. People are naturally attracted and intrigued by the forbidden. It's human nature."

Q: But if the forbidden is no longer forbidden, if taboos are lifted, and everything is spoken about openly...
"Yeah but speaking about it doesn't... I disagree. That's like saying, Oh, do you feel you've revealed too much about yourself? And I always say, Don't confuse physical nudity with what's inside of my soul; they're two different things. And talking about sexuality, provoking discussions about it, getting people to feel comfortable about discussing their sexual preference, does not mean that you've got to take every sexual taboo and rip it open, and put it out there, talk about it. That's not what I mean.

"What I mean to say is, if you find a nun sexy, that's all right. I don't mean to say, get the nun to take her clothes off, you see what she looks like and there's nothing sexy about it, so OK, get over it. That's not what I'm saying."

Q: But could it be that the more sex is talked about, the less interesting it becomes?
"I disagree with that. I think the more you feel comfortable about your sexual fantasies -- not that you have to go out and say it, say who it is or stand on top of a building naked -- the more you don't feel that you're a freak and bad and evil... To have sexual fantasies, to think that a nun is sexy, to wanna be tied up, there's nothing wrong with it. All I'm saying is that it's all healthy. You shouldn't feel a sense of shame about it."

Q: You know the accusation that sex is always an easy marketing tool. In any walk of life, including records and magazines, it helps to sell things.
"Well, it is. But I have a message. So... One does what one has to do to get attention. And in a way it's almost like, to me that was the innuendo of it. I called my book Sex because it was a very provocative title and I knew people would buy it because of that. And I knew people would want to buy it and look at the pictures and yet they denounced it at the same time, so I thought, that's a statement of our society in itself. People want to know about it, but if you ask them about it, they'll say it's bad. To me, I was trying to make a point with it all."

Q: In a recent interview you said you were being punished for the public stance you'd taken.
"I only said it once, and the writer of the magazine printed it 200 times in the article and made it seem as though I'd repeated myself over and over. She said to me, Do you think, in fact, you are being punished? And I said, Yes. So now it's like every time I open up a magazine: (weeps piteously) I've been punished! Boo-hoo. Get out the violins.

"I'm not feeling sorry for myself. But I do actually feel that it's true. After I put the Sex book out, because what I did was dealing with such a taboo, and because pop stars aren't supposed to have a point of view... You're supposed to stay popular and do things that are popular, that's what the word means. Once you cross that line there's a lot of fury to reckon with. And I think that because everybody did buy the book in spite of the fury that it caused, I think people made up their minds that they weren't going to be duped, and they punished me by... Every review of the movie or the album was really a review of the book. It was transparent: they weren't even talking about the songs or the music. OK, I thought, I get what's happening here. It was a shame, but I understand it."

Q: Do you regret that book?
"Not in the least."

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I gotta admit that they were a few songs that didn’t click for me from this album, but because of the #Erotica25 movement and all of this memories and interviews, I’m in love with the album now, it’s amazing and now I see the full picture unfold.

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On ‎31‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 6:43 AM, Mattress said:

"My judgement is never based on the world's reaction." - Madonna

AdBGt0e.jpg

Madonna's reflections on the Erotica era two years later (excerpted from Q Magazine, October 1994).

- - - - - - -

Q: What is the biggest disappointment of your musical career?
"The fact that my Erotica album was overlooked because of the whole thing with the Sex book. It just got lost in all that. I think there's some brilliant songs on it and people didn't give it a chance. That disappointed me, but I'm not disappointed in the record itself."

- - - - - - -

The point of Madonna is to cheer us up. Yet in America she is discussed to a phenomenal extent. She seems caught in that nation's psychic crossfire; enacting its fantasies, but also representing its innermost anxieties. Eminent authors and top academics debate her endlessly. (To read even a fraction of it can be tiring; the only known antidote is her greatest hits album, The Immaculate Collection, which offers sweet relief and a smart reminder of all that's truly important about her.)

She is used to notoriety by now, and to poor notices for her movie appearances. But even Madonna was shocked by the bashing given to her 1992 book Sex (metal-bound; much nudeness and rudity; Madge and chums in immoral frolics; one-star review in 'Q'). Many claimed that Madonna, the arch media-manipulator etc, had at last been wrong-footed. This was a new development. Previously, things didn't happen to Madonna -- she happened to them.

Now she faced condemnation from the moral fundamentalists and ridicule from elsewhere. Even though the book sold well -- and newspapers that rubbished it were careful to re-print as many pictures from it as they could -- its hyping left a poor after-taste. In all, it probably did nothing for her career.

It certainly did little for the idea that sex deserves privacy. She is for openness, believing it the opposite of ignorance; and if ignorance begets bigotry and guilt, so openness will bring happier times for all.

There is a thicket of thorny problems inside all this. You don't need to be a religious zealot to wonder if it's all quite right; the beliefs that she offends are often deeply held, and some of the skeptics are actually rather thoughtful. Is she up to the job she's taken on, or would she echo the poignant cry of Kenneth Williams, as he played the dying Julius Caesar: "Infamy! Infamy! They've all got it in for me!"

Q: For someone who is, basically, just an entertainer, you've become a battleground for debates about all kinds of things.
"Yes. Sexual politics, feminist politics..."

Q: What fame is supposed to be...
"Yeah. Well I think because I dealt with so many of those issues in my work, whether it be in 'Truth or Dare' [her 1991 'rockumentary', released in Britain under the inferior title 'In Bed With Madonna'] where I showed the inner workings of the life of a celebrity, and these are things that people always cover up... And sex, I talked about my sexual fantasies with different videos and songs. I talked about asserting your power, using everything you had, being feminine, if not feminist, being a sexual creature. My whole idea about empowering yourself is to use whatever strengths you have. To be in a man's world successfully you don't have to be like a man or dress like a man, or think like a man.

"All of these ideas went so against the grain of what you are allowed to talk about in public if you're a popular entertainer. All of a sudden it opened up the discussion, the people that were on my side, and the Moral Majority that was against me, then everyone started reviewing those opinions in the media. And it's still going strong. But I see my influences everywhere. And I'm amused by it." She laughs.

Q: Being said to cause enormous changes in society is a big gig to land on anyone, but...
"Yeah, I'll say!"

Q: But, to whatever extent, do you think you've done any good?
(Quite matter-of-factly.) "Absolutely. It's always good to provoke... a discussion, and get people to think. You cannot be an inspiration to people or a role model unless you have a point of view."

Q: Is it good or healthy to make sex such an open subject of discussion?
"Yes, absolutely. Most of our sexually delinquent behaviour is a direct result of sex being such a taboo subject, such an unspeakable thing. People keep everything inside; they're afraid to say what they feel or what they need. Something's gotta give. It's not healthy not to say what you prefer, who you are, what you desire. To live with that kind of shame has a very negative effect on people. And on society."

Q: But so many of the things that people find sexy are to do with repression. Bondage images... It's like, considered in the abstract, a nun seems a sexier thing than a sex therapist.
"Absolutely."

Q: But the one symbolizes repression of sexuality, the other is all for bringing it out in the open. How do you get around that?
"How you get around it is, that's the hypocrisy of it all. People are naturally attracted and intrigued by the forbidden. It's human nature."

Q: But if the forbidden is no longer forbidden, if taboos are lifted, and everything is spoken about openly...
"Yeah but speaking about it doesn't... I disagree. That's like saying, Oh, do you feel you've revealed too much about yourself? And I always say, Don't confuse physical nudity with what's inside of my soul; they're two different things. And talking about sexuality, provoking discussions about it, getting people to feel comfortable about discussing their sexual preference, does not mean that you've got to take every sexual taboo and rip it open, and put it out there, talk about it. That's not what I mean.

"What I mean to say is, if you find a nun sexy, that's all right. I don't mean to say, get the nun to take her clothes off, you see what she looks like and there's nothing sexy about it, so OK, get over it. That's not what I'm saying."

Q: But could it be that the more sex is talked about, the less interesting it becomes?
"I disagree with that. I think the more you feel comfortable about your sexual fantasies -- not that you have to go out and say it, say who it is or stand on top of a building naked -- the more you don't feel that you're a freak and bad and evil... To have sexual fantasies, to think that a nun is sexy, to wanna be tied up, there's nothing wrong with it. All I'm saying is that it's all healthy. You shouldn't feel a sense of shame about it."

Q: You know the accusation that sex is always an easy marketing tool. In any walk of life, including records and magazines, it helps to sell things.
"Well, it is. But I have a message. So... One does what one has to do to get attention. And in a way it's almost like, to me that was the innuendo of it. I called my book Sex because it was a very provocative title and I knew people would buy it because of that. And I knew people would want to buy it and look at the pictures and yet they denounced it at the same time, so I thought, that's a statement of our society in itself. People want to know about it, but if you ask them about it, they'll say it's bad. To me, I was trying to make a point with it all."

Q: In a recent interview you said you were being punished for the public stance you'd taken.
"I only said it once, and the writer of the magazine printed it 200 times in the article and made it seem as though I'd repeated myself over and over. She said to me, Do you think, in fact, you are being punished? And I said, Yes. So now it's like every time I open up a magazine: (weeps piteously) I've been punished! Boo-hoo. Get out the violins.

"I'm not feeling sorry for myself. But I do actually feel that it's true. After I put the Sex book out, because what I did was dealing with such a taboo, and because pop stars aren't supposed to have a point of view... You're supposed to stay popular and do things that are popular, that's what the word means. Once you cross that line there's a lot of fury to reckon with. And I think that because everybody did buy the book in spite of the fury that it caused, I think people made up their minds that they weren't going to be duped, and they punished me by... Every review of the movie or the album was really a review of the book. It was transparent: they weren't even talking about the songs or the music. OK, I thought, I get what's happening here. It was a shame, but I understand it."

Q: Do you regret that book?
"Not in the least."

 

Marvellous

Thank you for posting it

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To be in a man's world successfully you don't need to be like a man, dress like a man or think like a man

 

Amen

A concept completely lost on a certain brand of 70s feminism. Hello Germaine Greer and the likes.

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2 hours ago, XXL said:

To be in a man's world successfully you don't need to be like a man, dress like a man or think like a man

 

Amen

A concept completely lost on a certain brand of 70s feminism. Hello Germaine Greer and the likes.

I think to be successful, you just have to be true to yourself, regardless of gender. Madonna's gender was never her stumbling block, but an asset.

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On 31/10/2017 at 1:29 PM, jaron said:

just re-discovered my love to Thief of Heart and listening to it nonstop.

Stop bitch!
Now sit your ass down. 

One of my absolute favorite endings to any Madonna song.

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I heard Fever in a store today :D on the radio...like the 1st time since 1993 I think :D

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On 27/10/2017 at 6:10 PM, Mattress said:

Then, the MASSIVE four-hour Madonna Videography aired as part of MTV's Ultra Madonna weekend a few days before Ray Of Light was in stores. Here is the recap of the Erotica era.

 

It was this special, aired on MTV Brasil on august 1998 that made me "decide" I would become a fan. I watched everyday at 5 p.m.(it was devided on five segments) after school and took notes of every video or album/song to start to look for in stores. oh, this memory is so sweet.

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On ‎3‎.‎11‎.‎2017 at 7:21 PM, acko said:

I heard Fever in a store today :D on the radio...like the 1st time since 1993 I think :D

oh I heard Fever few years back every day on TV when Desperate Housewifes commercial came on.

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i heard Justify my Love at the local supermarket today...i was shocked lol

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Erotica has always been one of my favourites. There's something atmospheric about it, nostalgic... perfect record start to finish.

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