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karbatal    0

Since 2008 certain European countries are having economic struggles: Spain, Portugal, Greece... Many people from these countries have gone to work abroad. Those with more brilliant careers have gone to Germany, but those who simply wanted to spend a couple of years living an adventure and learning better English moved to the UK. Those are the ones who are working as waiters and all that. IN Germany they are the engineers and researchers.

Plus: in 2007, Romania and Bulgaria entered the EU. Many people from these countries, along with Poland some years before, have migrated. Some of them have gone to UK. To other countries too. 

And finally neocon policy means more meager salaries, while our spending has increased in the energy bills, food, and our consumerism leads us to buy more things than before and spend good money in internet bills. The cost of living is off the roof, houses are unaffordable, etc. In the end, people are much more poor now than ten years ago, not to mention 20 years ago. 

 

So you take all that recipe, and add another cultural elements, and you have the perfect meal.

WHY ARE WE POORER? Not because salaries have been frozen since 2001, or because capitalism has turned houses into some speculating item. Oh, no, it's because a Polish man cleans the dishes in the restaurant nearby. 

The Powers That Be won't let you blame neocons and bankers, but will point the inmigrants as responsible. The rest is history. 

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XXL    0

Banks poised to relocate out of UK over Brexit, British Bankers' Association warns

 

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http://www.bbc.com/news/business-37743700

Large banks are getting ready to relocate out of the UK early next year over fears around Brexit, the British Bankers' Association (BBA) has warned.

Writing in The Observer, its boss Anthony Browne also says smaller banks could move operations overseas by 2017.

"Their hands are quivering over the relocate button," he wrote. Most banks hadbacked the UK remaining in the EU.

Mr Browne also said the current "public and political debate at the moment is taking us in the wrong direction."

His comments build upon those he made at the BBA annual conference last week, when he said banks had already "set up project teams to work out what operations they need to move by when, and how best to do it".

 

'Legal right'

"Banking is probably more affected by Brexit than any other sector of the economy, both in the degree of impact and the scale of the implications," he told the newspaper.

"It is the UK's biggest export industry by far and is more internationally mobile than most. But it also gets its rules and legal rights to serve its customers cross-border from the EU."

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XXL    0

Theresa May has warned other European leaders that she won't be sidelined during Brexit negotiations. She said that the UK would continue 'to meet our rights and responsibilities' as long as it's a member of the European Union. The Prime Minister was speaking on the final day of the EU summit in Brussels

 

 

 

:rotfl:

 

 

The BBC journalist doesn't seem very convinced at her "answers"

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pjcowley    0
3 minutes ago, XXL said:

Theresa May has warned other European leaders that she won't be sidelined during Brexit negotiations. She said that the UK would continue 'to meet our rights and responsibilities' as long as it's a member of the European Union. The Prime Minister was speaking on the final day of the EU summit in Brussels

 

 

 

:rotfl:

 

 

The BBC journalist doesn't seem very convinced at her "answers"

What the fuck is she on about that demented fascist bitch?! Unbelievable. What a class of utter despicable characters.

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karbatal    0

The best is when Junker said to the UKIP deputees in the European Parliament: "are you still here?" :lmao::lmao::lmao:

Since the referendum nobody is taking this people seriously in the European summits. Some of them are fuming! But how can you listen to them if most decisions by the European Comission and European Council are mid-term? Mid-term that country will be out! 

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A little player has already entered the stage when it comes to the British banks. Allegedly Luxembourg is already luring British banks to move to Luxembourg, especially the funds. And here you have the perfect example of what goes wrong in Europe and what is one of the most important issues of the EU. Luxembourg is already a tax haven for many European companies, all S.E. registered in Luxembourg to save income tax. This needs to stop! There should be a harmonization of income taxes throughout the EU, to prevent those countries to make a business model out of it (Hello Ireland, Hello Cyprus) OR (and I prefer that option) income taxes must be paid in the country the profit has been generated because that would end all those creative company set ups (Hello Luxembourg). But quite frankly, this is not going to happen before the two most divisive figures leave their jobs. Junker and (but for other monetary reasons) Draghi.

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XXL    0
27 minutes ago, Raider of the lost Ark said:

A little player has already entered the stage when it comes to the British banks. Allegedly Luxembourg is already luring British banks to move to Luxembourg, especially the funds. And here you have the perfect example of what goes wrong in Europe and what is one of the most important issues of the EU. Luxembourg is already a tax haven for many European companies, all S.E. registered in Luxembourg to save income tax. This needs to stop! There should be a harmonization of income taxes throughout the EU, to prevent those countries to make a business model out of it (Hello Ireland, Hello Cyprus) OR (and I prefer that option) income taxes must be paid in the country the profit has been generated because that would end all those creative company set ups (Hello Luxembourg). But quite frankly, this is not going to happen before the two most divisive figures leave their jobs. Junker and (but for other monetary reasons) Draghi.

Totally agree. A common currency without a unified fiscal system is a damn joke or at least a system where companies that make their big profits by manufacturing in Eastern Europe at shamelessly and exploitatively low costs do not end up paying 12% corporate tax in Dublin (hello FIAT) after they have taken tens of millions in state/ taxpayers subsidies for years. And Mr Juncker was a former Luxembourg premiere. The current EU project is a mess as it is and too many double if not triple standards

But UK politicians telling their people and the people of the other 27 member states that "Britain wants access to the single market with all its benefits but nothing to do with immigration and freedom of movement policies" is an even bigger joke, imagine if the UK had been part of Schengen all along, not even that is satisfying enough apparently. I still do not understand the ability of the current UK political class to have cohesive, effective and REAL communication or their complete lack thereof.

Truth is also that all Western current monetary policies are an insult to people. That goes for the Federal Reserve, the European Central Bank and the Bank of England alike, they are yet again readying to crash the economy to introduce more centralisation of decision making and pilfer a bit more from the middle classes who are becoming the next working class, in a future where only two classes will exist that is.

The indefinite printing of money out of thin air, so called quantitative easing is a joke and a trecherous, dangerous one at that. When they start raising those interest rates again, in conjunction with other factors, such as commodity prices rigging, oil issues, war issues, sovreign debt issues (the China/US debt situation a perfect example)so on and so forth, that's when the next crash is going to happen.

We live in very tricky times, not everything is black or white and people are being riled up against one another, by religion, race, nationality, income etc because it's quite an effective way to screw them all up at one time

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16 minutes ago, XXL said:

Truth is that all Western current monetary policies are an insult to people. That goes for the Federal Reserve, the European Central Bank and the Bank of England alike, they are yet again readying to crash the economy to introduce more centralisation of decision making and pilfer a bit more from the middle classes who are becoming the next working class, in a future where only two classes will exist that is.

 

THIS! And everyone knows it.

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XXL    0

Theresa May has offered to involve Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in regular formal talks on Brexit. The Prime Minister has met the leaders of the devolved nations at Downing Street. But Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has described the talks as 'deeply frustrating'. The leaders are concerned about the impact of a so-called hard-Brexit, which would see the United Kingdom leave the single market.

 

 

 

 

 

Theresa May:  Scotland has more trade arrangements with the rest of the United Kingdom than it does with the European Union, its first and foremost desire should be to remain part of the United Kingdom  :old::old::old:

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XXL    0

https://www.ft.com/content/3cb030f6-97a8-11e6-a80e-bcd69f323a8b

Wallonia’s stand on trade spells trouble for Brexit

Parliamentary votes on EU-Canada deal set an ominous precedent

http%3A%2F%2Fcom.ft.imagepublish.prod.s3

 

Even the equable Canadians are losing patience with the EU’s inability to win backing for a trade deal that was meant to set new standards for advanced economies. The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement — seven years in the making — was to be signed this week. But on Friday, Canada’s trade minister walked away from emergency talks to salvage the deal, leaving EU and Belgian officials still tussling to overcome the resistance of the regional parliament of Wallonia.

In Brussels, some are still optimistic that a compromise will emerge, but the damage has already been done. The EU’s embarrassment over Ceta has dealt a huge blow to its credibility as a trade negotiator. If European governments cannot win backing for a deal of relatively modest scale with prosperous, socially progressive Canada, there is little hope of their framing an effective response to the threat of dumping by China, or of making progress on a far more contentious trade and investment deal with the US.

Yet the EU’s detractors should not dismiss the episode as just an illustration of Brussels dysfunctionality. The Walloons’ ability to spike an agreement covering some 550m people may seem absurd. However, their concerns, while they ought not to outweigh the merits of the deal, are real — and they reflect a broader political reality.

Ceta has become a focus of anti-globalisation protesters across the EU — even if Wallonia is appeased, it will remain subject to a challenge in Germany’s constitutional court. The EU-US Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership faces far tougher opposition in Europe, and has in effect stalled as a result of the protectionist tone of the US presidential campaign.

Given the animosity towards the EU in general and trade deals in particular, the decision to allow country by country ratification of Ceta, rather than asserting the EU’s right to set policy on external trade, was a pragmatic one. The deal would bring benefits, but it is not worth ramming it through at the cost of fuelling Eurosceptic sentiment and inflaming existing tensions between member states and the centre.

However, it has set an ominous precedent for the far more complex set of negotiations that has yet to begin, over the terms of Britain’s EU exit.

The commission’s “exclusive competence” to negotiate on trade has never been in question. But trade deals now go well beyond the traditional focus on cutting tariffs: Ceta would co-ordinate regulatory standards, align rules on intellectual property and lower barriers to investment. The pressure for parliamentary ratification arose over a controversial mechanism to settle disputes between investors and host countries — an issue previously dealt with by national governments.

It now seems likely that unless the UK limits itself to the most basic form of trade deal with the EU — covering little more than tariffs on trade in goods — it will have to undergo the same process to settle the terms of Brexit. Politicians around Europe are already blanching at the prospect, with one former trade commissioner describing any repeat of the Ceta procedure as a “very serious problem for Brexit”.

 

It would be wise for David Davis, the Brexit minister, to temper his blithe optimism that the UK can secure smooth access to EU markets. A threat to slap tariffs on German car imports is unlikely to prove persuasive with the long list of national and regional parliaments who may have a veto. Mr Davis once described the EU-Canada agreement as a good starting-point for talks with Brussels. Following this logic, any such deal will need to be both good for Britain and good for Wallonia.

 

 

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karbatal    0

Journalists should learn a bit more about the EU before they write, because that journo from Finacial Times (wow, such an important magazine with such shitty journalists) has no idea

The European Comission is the executive arm of the European Union. And laws about trade are not legislated by European Parliamet and Council, as other laws. The European Comission alone legislate.

This time, for this specific trade, the EC decided to allow national parliaments to have their say, to make this process more democratic. Just before, in Belgium there was a change in law that permited the regional parliament to have a say in international treaties. So this situation happened.

It has nothing to do with Brussels not being able to resolve its economic policy, or about the Brexit at all! 

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XXL    0
5 hours ago, karbatal said:

Journalists should learn a bit more about the EU before they write, because that journo from Finacial Times (wow, such an important magazine with such shitty journalists) has no idea

The European Comission is the executive arm of the European Union. And laws about trade are not legislated by European Parliamet and Council, as other laws. The European Comission alone legislate.

This time, for this specific trade, the EC decided to allow national parliaments to have their say, to make this process more democratic. Just before, in Belgium there was a change in law that permited the regional parliament to have a say in international treaties. So this situation happened.

It has nothing to do with Brussels not being able to resolve its economic policy, or about the Brexit at all! 

 

Well to be fair, the FT, of all outlets, is one of the most anti-brexit warriors among media circles. They have a so-called globalist agenda. What the author of the article is saying imo is that if a regional parliament of one of the current 28 member states can block a transcontinental deal that's been 7 years in the making, Britain on its own and outside of the single market has no hopes to stipulate 27 different trade deals or any deal with any other given country or economic block in the world.

Personally I am against this CETA, TTIP and the Trans Pacific deal because they just hand more power to multinationals, flood Europe with dangerous Monsanto GMOed poisonous "food", completely deregulate health and security standards, not to mention the increasing control and invasion of privacy and last but not least a continued impoverishment and exploitation of the working force. 

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XXL    0

You know, I can't believe it's been 71 years since the end of WW2 and yet here we are having a very dysfunctional Europe on multiple fronts and what is supposedly an opposition to an indeed faulty overly-bureaucratic centralised "economic" system is turning into a fight that's menacing to dismember a country such as the UK, of all countries. Laughing to keep from crying.

Meanwhile we have Russia being put into a corner, Syria and the general IS situation in the Middle East used as a proxy instrument, China threatening to push a dead man switch on the dollar and the ugly truth that an ever increasing amount of power, control and resources is getting devolved from the bottom to the very top, while people are getting distracted and caught up in the most superficial elements of a bigger picture at play

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Guest Pud Whacker   
Guest Pud Whacker
1 hour ago, acko said:

Aren't all miserable cunts?

 

:rotfl:True anti establishments. Which he's always been. 

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pjcowley    0
6 hours ago, XXL said:

 

Well to be fair, the FT, of all outlets, is one of the most anti-brexit warriors among media circles. They have a so-called globalist agenda. What the author of the article is saying imo is that if a regional parliament of one of the current 28 member states can block a transcontinental deal that's been 7 years in the making, Britain on its own and outside of the single market has no hopes to stipulate 27 different trade deals or any deal with any other given country or economic block in the world.

Personally I am against this CETA, TTIP and the Trans Pacific deal because they just hand more power to multinationals, flood Europe with dangerous Monsanto GMOed poisonous "food", completely deregulate health and security standards, not to mention the increasing control and invasion of privacy and last but not least a continued impoverishment and exploitation of the working force. 

 

6 hours ago, XXL said:

You know, I can't believe it's been 71 years since the end of WW2 and yet here we are having a very dysfunctional Europe on multiple fronts and what is supposedly an opposition to an indeed faulty overly-bureaucratic centralised "economic" system is turning into a fight that's menacing to dismember a country such as the UK, of all countries. Laughing to keep from crying.

Meanwhile we have Russia being put into a corner, Syria and the general IS situation in the Middle East used as a proxy instrument, China threatening to push a dead man switch on the dollar and the ugly truth that an ever increasing amount of power, control and resources is getting devolved from the bottom to the very top, while people are getting distracted and caught up in the most superficial elements of a bigger picture at play

100% agree

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Kim    0
On 25/10/2016 at 5:47 PM, XXL said:

....while people are getting distracted and caught up in the most superficial elements of a bigger picture at play

It's staggering how many people go about with their eyes closed and allow themselves to be duped. Hell mend them!

 

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Just watched the European Commissioner for trade on Amanpour discussing CETA. And sorry, this is totally frustrating because Amanpour is asking the wrong questions or her questions are very much working in favor of the mindset of the EU commission. They don't seem to understand or belittle the problems normal people have with those trade agreements. Always highlighting that this brings so many billions of additional revenue and creates tens of thousands of jobs. Assumptions that have been denounced by experts already, saying those numbers are hugely exaggerated. Especially the part with extra jobs. The thing people worry the most, are exactly the reasons why XXL is against CETA and TTIP " ... they just hand more power to multinationals, flood Europe with dangerous Monsanto GMOed poisonous "food", completely deregulate health and security standards, not to mention the increasing control and invasion of privacy and last but not least a continued impoverishment and exploitation of the working force." I would like to add the implementation of those, as I would call them, "private courts" that consist of five people, lawyers that settle lawsuits between foreign investors and sovereign countries. Usually ruling about billions and billions in damages for the loss of profits in case the sovereign country changes certain laws (environment, labour, health, energy etc. - how dare they?) that may interfere with their business. Something that I find unacceptable considering that all European countries are working democracies with working court systems, where disagreements could be handled on the base of existing laws. Not in a hush hush atmosphere in a small room. Who is going to control if all of this is legitimate, especially when those rulings are final and there is no way to appeal. Of course, it's the taxpayers money that is at risk. How dare those taxpayers complain about those treaties in advance? The argument of those in favor of those "private courts" is that it is hypocritical on part of the European countries like Germany that has several trade agreements that have those investment protection clauses. Well, what they don't mention is that those are agreements with countries that are very volatile democracies, always on the brink of a coup. Or they are changing the laws every time the government changes, which might be every five minutes in some countries. And court systems hardly exist. Of course their need to be such clauses. 

As I said, it's very disappointing that Amanpour has no idea about those issues or is badly briefed to confront the interviewee with those things. But what do I expect. Just today CNN had another of those "Brexit - Not so bad afterall" segments. Seriously, how stupid are they. Okay, the last sentence was that the Brexit has not even begun. But then better only report the overall business growth in the UK without mentioning the Brexit at all. Making relations when they are none is changing the narrative completely and devalues the story.

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XXL    0
On 25/10/2016 at 4:52 PM, Pud Whacker said:

 

Morrissey?

I am not surprised :lol:

Doubt though he has any idea of what he's talking about, as with other things he says in general

At the end of the day little changes for millionaires Brexit or No Brexit, EU surviving the mess that it's become or not

But it looks like we might have another global war long before we even get to that infamous triggering of Article 50

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XXL    0
1 hour ago, Raider of the lost Ark said:

Just watched the European Commissioner for trade on Amanpour discussing CETA. And sorry, this is totally frustrating because Amanpour is asking the wrong questions or her questions are very much working in favor of the mindset of the EU commission. They don't seem to understand or belittle the problems normal people have with those trade agreements. Always highlighting that this brings so many billions of additional revenue and creates tens of thousands of jobs. Assumptions that have been denounced by experts already, saying those numbers are hugely exaggerated. Especially the part with extra jobs. The thing people worry the most, are exactly the reasons why XXL is against CETA and TTIP " ... they just hand more power to multinationals, flood Europe with dangerous Monsanto GMOed poisonous "food", completely deregulate health and security standards, not to mention the increasing control and invasion of privacy and last but not least a continued impoverishment and exploitation of the working force." I would like to add the implementation of those, as I would call them, "private courts" that consist of five people, lawyers that settle lawsuits between foreign investors and sovereign countries. Usually ruling about billions and billions in damages for the loss of profits in case the sovereign country changes certain laws (environment, labour, health, energy etc. - how dare they?) that may interfere with their business. Something that I find unacceptable considering that all European countries are working democracies with working court systems, where disagreements could be handled on the base of existing laws. Not in a hush hush atmosphere in a small room. Who is going to control if all of this is legitimate, especially when those rulings are final and there is no way to appeal. Of course, it's the taxpayers money that is at risk. How dare those taxpayers complain about those treaties in advance? The argument of those in favor of those "private courts" is that it is hypocritical on part of the European countries like Germany that has several trade agreements that have those investment protection clauses. Well, what they don't mention is that those are agreements with countries that are very volatile democracies, always on the brink of a coup. Or they are changing the laws every time the government changes, which might be every five minutes in some countries. And court systems hardly exist. Of course their need to be such clauses. 

As I said, it's very disappointing that Amanpour has no idea about those issues or is badly briefed to confront the interviewee with those things. But what do I expect. Just today CNN had another of those "Brexit - Not so bad afterall" segments. Seriously, how stupid are they. Okay, the last sentence was that the Brexit has not even begun. But then better only report the overall business growth in the UK without mentioning the Brexit at all. Making relations when they are none is changing the narrative completely and devalues the story.

 

:thumbsup:

 

By the way he CETA deal deadlock has been broken by the Belgian government today which means it will go ahead and some are already predicting it could be the backdoor to a merger between the EU block and NAFTA. This deals are basically a gift to Monsanto and the likes who are killing people with their carcinogenic laboratory "food".  Take a gene from a dog and mix it with that of a  plant to create a whole new food and we're going to feed Africa for a penny, right? (As if they cared to feed Africa to begin with, which could be already achieved with the resources that get systematically wasted) Crazy! 

Today we've had the umpteenth report in Italy of farmers protesting against the fact that Italy is being flooded by cheap wheat  (same issue with milk producers - so called EU quotas) from all over the world and that they have to compete with producers who are under no obligation to indicate on the label of their products anything about the quality and provenance of the product itself.

Add to these picture the sanctions against Russia and the retaliatory sanctions of Russia against EU countries who cannot export their food there which has proven to be yet another dumb, ineffective policy of coercing Russia to "back off". (while NATO has been amassing its troops on the Baltic, in the Mediterannean, you name it on a daily basis for months and months) ....

 

This piece of shit is one of the most famous oncologists in Italy, he has a very well known and well funded campaign against consumption of tobacco, yet he takes money from Monsanto to tell Italian people that GM food is good for their health :abuse:  TTIP; CETA and the transpacific deals are essentially all transnational agreements that will greatly favour this type of tactics

 

veronesi.jpg

 

 

 

Anyway British politicians who've peddled Brexit as part of an internal party politics struggle, telling 500m people in Europe that it's ok for the UK to reap the benefits of single market access but that they shouldn't be asked to share the downside of freedom of movement like the other club members have to, are still an insult not only to British taxpayers but to all other 27 EU nationalities. 

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XXL    0
On 27/10/2016 at 0:16 AM, Kim said:

It's staggering how many people go about with their eyes closed and allow themselves to be duped. Hell mend them!

 

Indeed

:rotfl:  @  Hell mend them

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Guest Pud Whacker   
Guest Pud Whacker
4 hours ago, XXL said:

 

Morrissey?

I am not surprised :lol:

Doubt though he has any idea of what he's talking about, as with other things he says in general

At the end of the day little changes for millionaires Brexit or No Brexit, EU surviving the mess that it's become or not

But it looks like we might have another global war long before we even get to that infamous triggering of Article 50

He's always been anti establishment. Like Madonna used to be!!! 

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