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6 hours ago, Kim said:

Yes, I don't necessarily disagree with what he says most of the time, unfortunately a great majority of his OWN parliamentary party does though and his rhetoric ends up sounding hollow. He's not a great communicator or debater and that is unfortunately a vital part of being opposition leader. He really should have hammered the Tories on that u-turn, and on the burgeoning electoral fraud expenses scandal, and on Davis' admittance that there is no plan B if the Brexit negotiations in Europe result in no consensus. Instead, he makes the news for bumbling again.

 

Totally

The irony is that the only sane British politicians at the moment appear to be from one of the nations comprising the Union that won't accept the gambling away of the country's future in pursuit of petty little personal agendas. It would really be wonderful if Labour had someone like Mr Robertson who could own Theresa May the way he does rather than Corbyn's tripping and falling in his own speeches

What amazes me are the words of Old Guard Thatcherites such as Kenneth Clark and Lord Heseltine who have savaged their own party gimmicks and looking at history you wouldn't have thought you could get much worse than Thatcher /Reagan era politics but it appears the current Tory establishment has surpassed their predecessors. Meanwhile David Cameron must be enjoying the advance on his next book, tragic times we live in

 

Alice-Meme.jpg

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http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/theresa-may-labour-party-policy-energy-prices-tarrifs-spiral-rises-tackle-tory-spring-conference-a7635161.html

Theresa May steals Labour policy by vowing to tackle spiraling energy prices

Prime Minister echoes Ed Miliband by admitting ‘the market is not working as it should’ – hinting at a cap to be announced soon

 

theresa-may-1.jpg

 

 

Theresa May has stolen Labour clothes by vowing to act on sky-high energy prices, saying: “It is clear to me – and to anyone who looks at it – that the market is not working as it should.” In a speech to the party faithful in Cardiff, the Prime Minister said prices had soared by 158 per cent over the last 15 years, with the poorest hit by the highest tariffs.

“Our party did not end the unjust and inefficient monopolies of the old nationalised energy corporations only to replace them with a system that traps the poorest customers on the worst deals,” she said.

Ms May did not set out how her crackdown would work, but the pledge revived memories of Ed Miliband’s plans to intervene in the energy market – condemned by the Tories at the time.

 

Addressing the Conservative Spring Forum, the Prime Minister also sharpened her attack on the SNP’s determination to stage a second Scottish independence referendum.

“Three years ago they campaigned for a result that would have taken Scotland out of the EU altogether,” she said. “They are happy to see power rest in Brussels. But if those powers come back to London, they want them given to Edinburgh – so that they can try to give them back to Brussels.   :manson:  :manson:  

“And now they apparently say that an independent Scotland would no longer seek to become a member of the EU after a vote for separation. It is muddle on muddle.”

 

 

 

 

 

:rotfl:  :rotfl:

 

 

We are now the party of a new centre ground of British politics. Rejecting the extremes of Labour's socialist Left, UKIP's libertarian Right and the divisive and obsessive nationalisms of Plaid Cymru and the SNP

 

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The markets NEVER worked as they should.  

Stupid CUNTS always repeating history and making people poorer.  

 

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I´m afraid it´s quite like that, or at least is what a lot of people think about it in the continent.

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Alliance Leader Naomi Long has described as "surreal" the Prime Minister's plans to visit Northern Ireland but not get involved in ongoing talks designed to restore powersharing.

Theresa May will visit Northern Ireland ahead of the triggering of Article 50, which will start the formal process of removing the UK from the EU. However, Mrs Long said it is almost unbelievable she would do so during the current devolution crisis and seek to remain outside of the ongoing talks.

"Brexit is without doubt the biggest political, economic and social challenge to face Europe and the UK in a generation. It has also divided the UK deeply in terms not only of support for Brexit, but also the challenges it presents in each region.

"The Prime Minister ought therefore to seek to discuss the matter with the devolved regions and be sensitive in seeking to represent their concerns, however, this whistle stop tour, far from demonstrating a willingness to engage and listen, seems to typify the lack of sensitivity to the particular challenges facing Northern Ireland, not least by the collapse of devolution.

"It is quite surreal to think Theresa May would visit Northern Ireland at a time when the very future of powersharing hangs in the balance, yet not feel compelled to actively participate in the current talks process. It suggests a Prime Minister who is either oblivious to the perilous state of devolution or simply doesn't care.

"At what is a critical time in the negotiations and in the Brexit process, I think it is important the Prime Minister considers carefully the message such non-engagement will send to the people of Northern Ireland regarding the importance of devolution and Northern Ireland's interests to her Government. Otherwise, what is intended to reassure people of her interest could spectacularly backfire."

 

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Why doesn't this demented old witch just LISTEN to what the devolved parliaments are asking for? Is she seriously considering having a hard border in Ireland where right now you can just walk from one side to the other like on an afternoon stroll? And if she doesn't, then that means Scotland/England could have the same soft border. The countries that didn't vote for Brexit want to remain in the single market if not the EU. She should respect that and put that option on the table. Simple.

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wow, that march in London was really crowded. Maybe in UK it's lived otherwise, but for me it seems those are a "silent majority", they are barely in the news the pro-EU british people. 

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pro-EU Brits are silenced by filthy Murdoch-dictated British media...

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26 minutes ago, pjcowley said:

 

This makes me so happy!

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4 hours ago, pjcowley said:

 

I love this. Uk belongs to Europe. Brexit still doesn't make any sense to me after all these months.

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17 minutes ago, Rebel Saviour said:

I love this. Uk belongs to Europe. Brexit still doesn't make any sense to me after all these months.

I know. There is so much in British politics not making sense - a demented fascist bitch bossing everyone around when she hasn't even been elected... British citizens living abroad for more than 15 years denied the right to vote... Scaremongering xenophobic lies propelled Brexit when the UK really had it easy compared to other EU members.

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Just now, pjcowley said:

 

finally!!!

 

I saw this on the news here, but they didn´t show any big images to see if there were a lot of peole.Anyways, I think it´s good that they are showing it

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http://www.sinnfein.ie/contents/44000

What does this mean for us, citizens who voted for change and resolution.

The blame game will start, propaganda will proliferate, spin will be rife, budgets will not be set, people in the voluntary sector will lose their jobs and we'll be unrepresented during Brexit talks.

Above all, we down from the Hill, demand and expect honesty, not lies from our politicians.

We don't want another election, we don't want direct rule: we demand representation at a standard expected by citizens of other devolved governments!

It's just not good enough!

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Article 50 has been triggered by an Unelected PM from a govt none of us voted for, who foolishly started the process to force us out of the EU against our will with absolutely no regard for the people of Northern Ireland, the young, the poor, the disabled, the environment or EU citizens whom have built their lives here and contribute to our society.

This won't be a Brexit for the British people, this will be a Brexit for the Conservative party and their donors.

Get organised. Viva la revolution 

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31 minutes ago, BrendanT1993 said:

Article 50 has been triggered by an Unelected PM from a govt none of us voted for, who foolishly started the process to force us out of the EU against our will with absolutely no regard for the people of Northern Ireland, the young, the poor, the disabled, the environment or EU citizens whom have built their lives here and contribute to our society.

This won't be a Brexit for the British people, this will be a Brexit for the Conservative party and their donors.

Get organised. Viva la revolution 

I stand with you - I am definitely going to be fucked negatively affected by this totally selfish foolish decision.

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The pic and the account name "The Daily Theresagraph" so fucking true :lmao:

 

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Brexit: The UK's letter triggering Article 50

 

Here is the full text of Theresa May's letter to European Council president Donald Tusk, beginning the start of Brexit negotiations:

 

Dear President Tusk

On 23 June last year, the people of the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union. As I have said before, that decision was no rejection of the values we share as fellow Europeans. Nor was it an attempt to do harm to the European Union or any of the remaining member states. On the contrary, the United Kingdom wants the European Union to succeed and prosper. Instead, the referendum was a vote to restore, as we see it, our national self-determination. We are leaving the European Union, but we are not leaving Europe - and we want to remain committed partners and allies to our friends across the continent.

Earlier this month, the United Kingdom Parliament confirmed the result of the referendum by voting with clear and convincing majorities in both of its Houses for the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill. The Bill was passed by Parliament on 13 March and it received Royal Assent from Her Majesty The Queen and became an Act of Parliament on 16 March.

Today, therefore, I am writing to give effect to the democratic decision of the people of the United Kingdom. I hereby notify the European Council in accordance with Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union of the United Kingdom's intention to withdraw from the European Union. In addition, in accordance with the same Article 50(2) as applied by Article 106a of the Treaty Establishing the European Atomic Energy Community, I hereby notify the European Council of the United Kingdom's intention to withdraw from the European Atomic Energy Community. References in this letter to the European Union should therefore be taken to include a reference to the European Atomic Energy Community.

This letter sets out the approach of Her Majesty's Government to the discussions we will have about the United Kingdom's departure from the European Union and about the deep and special partnership we hope to enjoy - as your closest friend and neighbour - with the European Union once we leave. We believe that these objectives are in the interests not only of the United Kingdom but of the European Union and the wider world too.

It is in the best interests of both the United Kingdom and the European Union that we should use the forthcoming process to deliver these objectives in a fair and orderly manner, and with as little disruption as possible on each side. We want to make sure that Europe remains strong and prosperous and is capable of projecting its values, leading in the world, and defending itself from security threats. We want the United Kingdom, through a new deep and special partnership with a strong European Union, to play its full part in achieving these goals. We therefore believe it is necessary to agree the terms of our future partnership alongside those of our withdrawal from the European Union.

The Government wants to approach our discussions with ambition, giving citizens and businesses in the United Kingdom and the European Union - and indeed from third countries around the world - as much certainty as possible, as early as possible.

I would like to propose some principles that may help to shape our coming discussions, but before I do so, I should update you on the process we will be undertaking at home, in the United Kingdom.

The process in the United Kingdom

As I have announced already, the Government will bring forward legislation that will repeal the Act of Parliament - the European Communities Act 1972 - that gives effect to EU law in our country. This legislation will, wherever practical and appropriate, in effect convert the body of existing European Union law (the "acquis") into UK law. This means there will be certainty for UK citizens and for anybody from the European Union who does business in the United Kingdom. The Government will consult on how we design and implement this legislation, and we will publish a White Paper tomorrow. We also intend to bring forward several other pieces of legislation that address specific issues relating to our departure from the European Union, also with a view to ensuring continuity and certainty, in particular for businesses. We will of course continue to fulfil our responsibilities as a member state while we remain a member of the European Union, and the legislation we propose will not come into effect until we leave.

From the start and throughout the discussions, we will negotiate as one United Kingdom, taking due account of the specific interests of every nation and region of the UK as we do so. When it comes to the return of powers back to the United Kingdom, we will consult fully on which powers should reside in Westminster and which should be devolved to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. But it is the expectation of the Government that the outcome of this process will be a significant increase in the decision-making power of each devolved administration.

Negotiations between the United Kingdom and the European Union

The United Kingdom wants to agree with the European Union a deep and special partnership that takes in both economic and security cooperation. To achieve this, we believe it is necessary to agree the terms of our future partnership alongside those of our withdrawal from the EU.

If, however, we leave the European Union without an agreement the default position is that we would have to trade on World Trade Organisation terms. In security terms a failure to reach agreement would mean our cooperation in the fight against crime and terrorism would be weakened. In this kind of scenario, both the United Kingdom and the European Union would of course cope with the change, but it is not the outcome that either side should seek. We must therefore work hard to avoid that outcome.

It is for these reasons that we want to be able to agree a deep and special partnership, taking in both economic and security cooperation, but it is also because we want to play our part in making sure that Europe remains strong and prosperous and able to lead in the world, projecting its values and defending itself from security threats. And we want the United Kingdom to play its full part in realising that vision for our continent.

Proposed principles for our discussions

Looking ahead to the discussions which we will soon begin, I would like to suggest some principles that we might agree to help make sure that the process is as smooth and successful as possible.

i. We should engage with one another constructively and respectfully, in a spirit of sincere cooperation. Since I became Prime Minister of the United Kingdom I have listened carefully to you, to my fellow EU Heads of Government and the Presidents of the European Commission and Parliament. That is why the United Kingdom does not seek membership of the single market: we understand and respect your position that the four freedoms of the single market are indivisible and there can be no "cherry picking". We also understand that there will be consequences for the UK of leaving the EU: we know that we will lose influence over the rules that affect the European economy. We also know that UK companies will, as they trade within the EU, have to align with rules agreed by institutions of which we are no longer a part - just as UK companies do in other overseas markets.

ii. We should always put our citizens first. There is obvious complexity in the discussions we are about to undertake, but we should remember that at the heart of our talks are the interests of all our citizens. There are, for example, many citizens of the remaining member states living in the United Kingdom, and UK citizens living elsewhere in the European Union, and we should aim to strike an early agreement about their rights.

iii. We should work towards securing a comprehensive agreement. We want to agree a deep and special partnership between the UK and the EU, taking in both economic and security cooperation. We will need to discuss how we determine a fair settlement of the UK's rights and obligations as a departing member state, in accordance with the law and in the spirit of the United Kingdom's continuing partnership with the EU. But we believe it is necessary to agree the terms of our future partnership alongside those of our withdrawal from the EU.

iv. We should work together to minimise disruption and give as much certainty as possible. Investors, businesses and citizens in both the UK and across the remaining 27 member states - and those from third countries around the world - want to be able to plan. In order to avoid any cliff-edge as we move from our current relationship to our future partnership, people and businesses in both the UK and the EU would benefit from implementation periods to adjust in a smooth and orderly way to new arrangements. It would help both sides to minimise unnecessary disruption if we agree this principle early in the process.

v. In particular, we must pay attention to the UK's unique relationship with the Republic of Ireland and the importance of the peace process in Northern Ireland. The Republic of Ireland is the only EU member state with a land border with the United Kingdom. We want to avoid a return to a hard border between our two countries, to be able to maintain the Common Travel Area between us, and to make sure that the UK's withdrawal from the EU does not harm the Republic of Ireland. We also have an important responsibility to make sure that nothing is done to jeopardise the peace process in Northern Ireland, and to continue to uphold the Belfast Agreement.

vi. We should begin technical talks on detailed policy areas as soon as possible, but we should prioritise the biggest challenges. Agreeing a high-level approach to the issues arising from our withdrawal will of course be an early priority. But we also propose a bold and ambitious Free Trade Agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union. This should be of greater scope and ambition than any such agreement before it so that it covers sectors crucial to our linked economies such as financial services and network industries. This will require detailed technical talks, but as the UK is an existing EU member state, both sides have regulatory frameworks and standards that already match. We should therefore prioritise how we manage the evolution of our regulatory frameworks to maintain a fair and open trading environment, and how we resolve disputes. On the scope of the partnership between us - on both economic and security matters - my officials will put forward detailed proposals for deep, broad and dynamic cooperation.

vii. We should continue to work together to advance and protect our shared European values. Perhaps now more than ever, the world needs the liberal, democratic values of Europe. We want to play our part to ensure that Europe remains strong and prosperous and able to lead in the world, projecting its values and defending itself from security threats.

The task before us

As I have said, the Government of the United Kingdom wants to agree a deep and special partnership between the UK and the EU, taking in both economic and security cooperation. At a time when the growth of global trade is slowing and there are signs that protectionist instincts are on the rise in many parts of the world, Europe has a responsibility to stand up for free trade in the interest of all our citizens. Likewise, Europe's security is more fragile today than at any time since the end of the Cold War. Weakening our cooperation for the prosperity and protection of our citizens would be a costly mistake. The United Kingdom's objectives for our future partnership remain those set out in my Lancaster House speech of 17 January and the subsequent White Paper published on 2 February.

We recognise that it will be a challenge to reach such a comprehensive agreement within the two-year period set out for withdrawal discussions in the Treaty. But we believe it is necessary to agree the terms of our future partnership alongside those of our withdrawal from the EU. We start from a unique position in these discussions - close regulatory alignment, trust in one another's institutions, and a spirit of cooperation stretching back decades. It is for these reasons, and because the future partnership between the UK and the EU is of such importance to both sides, that I am sure it can be agreed in the time period set out by the Treaty.

The task before us is momentous but it should not be beyond us. After all, the institutions and the leaders of the European Union have succeeded in bringing together a continent blighted by war into a union of peaceful nations, and supported the transition of dictatorships to democracy. Together, I know we are capable of reaching an agreement about the UK's rights and obligations as a departing member state, while establishing a deep and special partnership that contributes towards the prosperity, security and global power of our continent.

Yours sincerely

Theresa May

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-39431070

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