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10 Things I Learned at Madonna’s Rebel Heart Tour

http://www.slantmagazine.com/house/article/10-things-i-learned-at-madonnas-rebel-heart-tour

I really doubt that Madge hates Take A Bow and she doesn't rely too heavily on lip synching but whatever.

It's easy to say she hates Take A Bow but she ignores most of the 1990s on tour anyway, even 2 ROL singles were never performed...

Well she cannot really reproduce the MDNA or Rebel Heart vocals live so a lot of those are lipsynched like Bitch I'm Madonna, Holy Water or Body Shop but on this tour her live singing shines with Who's That Girl etc so it's fine.

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It's easy to say she hates Take A Bow but she ignores most of the 1990s on tour anyway, even 2 ROL singles were never performed...

Well she cannot really reproduce the MDNA or Rebel Heart vocals live so a lot of those are lipsynched like Bitch I'm Madonna, Holy Water or Body Shop but on this tour her live singing shines with Who's That Girl etc so it's fine.

Im sorry but you totally mistaken. Those are full live vocals. Heavy autotune on parts but absolutely and clearly live. (Seemed to use less autotune/vocoder in NY shows in Body Shop btw. )
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It's easy to say she hates Take A Bow but she ignores most of the 1990s on tour anyway, even 2 ROL singles were never performed...

Well she cannot really reproduce the MDNA or Rebel Heart vocals live so a lot of those are lipsynched like Bitch I'm Madonna, Holy Water or Body Shop but on this tour her live singing shines with Who's That Girl etc so it's fine.

body shop lipsynched?

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Im sorry but you totally mistaken. Those are full live vocals. Heavy autotune on parts but absolutely and clearly live. (Seemed to use less autotune/vocoder in NY shows in Body Shop btw. )

exactly

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Glad Liz noticed the same thing I did. That hardly ANYONE left their seat for the whole show and the entire arena was enthralled from start to finish.

Like I said her other tours that I saw during certain moments you would look around and see empty seats everywhere as people took a bathroom and drink break.

Poor Madonna during Confessions. I remember when she did Paradise Not For Me and the floor started to clear out everywhere. I didn't even get to enjoy that performance because I constantly had people walking in front of me to take a break. It was funny seeing everyone rush back in once Music started though. :lol:

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posted on Popjustice

Rumor: "Take a Bow" will be part of the ‪Rebel Heart Tour‬ in the next dates *.*

https://www.facebook.com/2729426960...41825.272942696098343/934160463309893/?type=1

:dramatic:

No matter how much we wish to hear it live, I just can't see it fitting in the show at all. It's basically a heartbreaking song (like Heartbreak City) and the complete opposite of her living for love message at this stage...

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I think I know why she is doing arenas now: because on stadiums she can't control the weather/temperature and she gets sick like she got super sick on the MDNA Tour in LA with the rain and all. Even Donatella Versace said she had never seen her as bad as she was during the MDNA Tour. I think she won't do stadiums for this reason alone. In the arena she can turn off the AC if it's too cold and she can charge a bit more and make up a bit for what it's lost for not doing stadiums since the Demand is there, but at least she doesn't get ****ed sick like she did on MDNA

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She has been rehearsing a number of songs over the summer and she will ocassionaly switch numbers. She's teased a lot of songs on IG that haven't been performed on the first few dates. I don't see how TAB can't happen, totally credible rumour

Nobody thought she'd sing GT but she did. And I bet there will also be a few extra changes during the 2016 run. She always switches things up when on a long tour. And for the Australasian dates which are 5 and 6 months from now I don't see her keeping the show exactly as it is now either

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Maybe I'm wrong, but seems to me she only does surprise extra songs in the US and only a few times. So I'm not betting on hearing Ghosttown.

I would think You'll See fit much more with the themes than TAB.

Strange to hear people leaving for breaks so much in her shows, I have never witnessed that! Perhaps this behaviour is in the US only as well?

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Great read from pitchfork of all places. Must read for everyone!!

http://pitchfork.com/thepitch/904-i-made-it-through-the-wilderness-on-gay-fandom-and-growing-older-with-madonna/

By T. Cole Rachel, September 21, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. EDT

Photo by Mert and Marcus

As stereotypically gay music experiences go, you can’t go much gayer than attending the opening night of a Madonna tour. I say this fondly, and as a forty-something gay man who has seen lots of ostensibly very gay things, including but not limited to Kylie Minogue’s Fever tour, a semi-private Celine Dion concert in New York City, and multiple Erasure tours. Within the pantheon of music culture that gay men hold dear, Madonna has been serving as a defacto ambassador for nearly 30 years since. Admittedly, talking about gay diva worship in pop culture is to trade in both old stereotypes and terrible clichés, but standing outside Montreal’s Bell Centre Arena on the opening night of Madonna’s Rebel Heart tour, it’s hard not to ponder the connection, standing amid sea of excited gay men—most of them sporting Madonna shirts from previous tours, with a few of them dressed as Madge herself. A DJ outside the venue was spinning Madonna remixes and a pack of horned dancers provided "Living for Love" photo ops in front of a Rebel Heart backdrop. There were of course women, and perhaps a younger audience than expected, but Madonna’s audience of gay men is holding steady.

Since interviewing Madonna for Pitchfork earlier this year, I have often been thrust into the strange position of being a Madonna apologist in the course of conversations about her. Why does she insist on competing with teenage pop stars? (Why not?) Why does she work with the trendiest young producers? (She always has.) Why is she still showing her ass in public? (Again, why the fuck not?) It’s a curious role for someone who doesn’t even own all of her later records. As a goth teen in the late '80s, my bedroom altar was dedicated to Siouxsie Sioux, who articulated my particular strain of teenage ennui.

Still, I loved Madonna for what she represented. That she spoke about AIDS and advocated for gay people at a time when few else did was inspiring to me. When she showed up on "David Letterman" with Sandra Bernhard, the way she seemed born of a mythical downtown NYC I’d only ever read about was life-giving. Yet, after the interview ran, I was kind of amazed at how much grief I encountered on her behalf, most of which can be summed up with some version of How Dare She STILL Be Doing This. She’s always been a polarizing figure in pop culture, but as she gets older she becomes polarizing in a new ways; her steadfastness and tenacity as a controversial pop icon are taken as an affront.

After all the noise surrounding the leak and subsequent release of Rebel Heart, the cape-yanking tumble at the Brits, her often questionable Instagram activity, her insistence on remaining both sexual and youthful at the age of 57 (despite the fact that media outlets talk about her as if she was 97), being in a room full of liquored up Madonna fans at the opening night of her tour is to experience her influence made manifest. Also, her longtime fans don’t give a fuck about any of that stuff. In the hearts and minds of those whose lives she has religiously soundtracked for the past 30 years, Madonna is pretty much beyond reproach.

It helps that the Rebel Heart tour, as it turns out, is the most retrospective thing Madonna has done in a decade, mostly dispensing with the thematic narratives of previous shows in favor of something altogether lighter. The show is still an outrageously choreographed spectacle—in which dancers clad as nuns poledance, and Madonna herself first appears in a gilded cage that is lowered from the ceiling—but unlike previous tours, in which she danced, sang, and yoga-posed always like a woman with something to prove. Comparatively, the Rebel Heart tour actually seems like, well, fun. She smiles. She jokes about her own image. She belts out "La Vie En Rose" while playing a ukulele. She does faithful renditions of "True Blue" and "La Isla Bonita" that resulted in nearly deafening arena-sized sing-alongs. The show itself, while still offering plenty of cuts from the new record, also showed Madonna giving a very sweet nod to her own history, something she’s seemed wary of in the past, as if looking backwards too much somehow nullifies the potential of her future.

Madonna isn’t always easy to love, even if you happen to really love her. But why should she be? She may not always give people what they want, but she reliably gives people what she wants, which is just as admirable. Her legacy at this point is untouchable—though her position in popular culture circa right now is a weirdly untenable one. Were she to abandon making new music and simply play the hits, she’d get called out for finally having become a nostalgia act. When she makes new music now—having already recorded a gazillion iconic singles—she gets shit for it, regardless of said music’s quality. Part of what infuriates people about Madonna is that, despite all of this, she remains unbowed. And this, of course, is why gay men love her.

Gay fandom is a complicated phenomenon and one, quite honestly, that I don’t always understand. But what Madonna means, particular for gay folks of a certain age, is something that is not to be taken lightly. These days it’s de rigueur for pop stars to support, embrace, and court a gay fanbase, but back in the '80s that was hardly the case. At a time when an entire generation was being lost to AIDS, Madonna was one of our biggest advocates. (She’s actually the first person I remember ever seeing utter the word "condom" on television, via her MTV safe sex PSAs) At a time when representations of gay people in mainstream media were few and far between, seeing Truth or Dare—a film that matter-of-factly depicts gay friendships in a way my teenage self had never before seen—was an unexpected lifeline. For a lot of gay kids who felt adrift in our secluded, pre-Internet teenage bedrooms, seeing Madonna cavorting with her gay dancers and actually celebrating their queerness felt like evidence that there was indeed a different kind of life out there for us—a club that might actually want us as a member.

I couldn’t stop thinking about all of these things while watching Madonna do a writhing version of "Like a Virgin" some 20 feet in front of me, a bizarro "I made it through the wilderness" moment that apparently a lot of the people in the room were also having. Aging along with your heroes is often weird. Some people—David Bowie, Patti Smith, for example—make it seem easy, cool even, while others (George Michael, I’m looking at you) make it really uncomfortable. For me, Madonna exists somewhere in the middle of those two extremes. Given that her whole career has been defined by pushing back against the status quo, it makes sense that she would continue to do so now. If she bristles at the mention of retirement (as she did when I talked to her), it’s totally understandable. People have been asking her about "aging gracefully" since she entered her thirties. Her career begs the question, at what point is anyone expected to give up doing what they love? And at what point is it considered necessary to give up on your idols and surrender to the tyranny of coolness?

As I get older, I increasingly hope the answer to those questions is never. Singing "Who’s That Girl" along with several thousand other gay men at the Montreal show proved to be surprisingly emotional for me, a rare instance of feeling part of some shared, mainstream gay experience. Watching Madonna medley her way back through the past three decades, I kept thinking about the guy in the lobby I’d seen earlier wearing a Keith Haring t-shirt and how Madonna herself had gotten choked up talking about Keith, as well as the countless other people who supported her career early on and were lost to AIDS. At some point during the show—maybe around the time she pulled out Erotica’s "Deeper and Deeper"—I scarcely noticed when my own cynicism about the whole thing evaporated while I danced. As a person who works in a culture that gleefully encourages snark and bitchiness and in which expressing admiration in a non-ironic way is often seen as a sign of weakness, it’s nice to be reminded how refreshing it is to simply love something because it makes you feel alive.

As Madonna neared the end of the show, it was nice to see that she too seemed genuinely moved by the feeling in the room. She gave up her tightly rehearsed performer posturing for a few minutes and simply became human, smiling and pausing to address the crowd. "Thank you so much for sticking with me all these years," she said. As me and my boyfriend started to drunkenly applaud, we were drowned out by the queen behind me who seemed to sum up everyone’s feelings by screaming out, "That’s right, bitch! Somehow we’re all still here. Aren’t we lucky?"

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I think I know why she is doing arenas now: because on stadiums she can't control the weather/temperature and she gets sick like she got super sick on the MDNA Tour in LA with the rain and all. Even Donatella Versace said she had never seen her as bad as she was during the MDNA Tour. I think she won't do stadiums for this reason alone. In the arena she can turn off the AC if it's too cold and she can charge a bit more and make up a bit for what it's lost for not doing stadiums since the Demand is there, but at least she doesn't get ****ed sick like she did on MDNA

Hmmm interesting but I don't think it's the reason.

MDNA and Rebel Heart are both shows for an arena....Madonna is essentially an arena act.

The lighting, the staging, the theatre and certainly the intermecey of this tour wouldn't work out in a stadium.

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I think I know why she is doing arenas now: because on stadiums she can't control the weather/temperature and she gets sick like she got super sick on the MDNA Tour in LA with the rain and all. Even Donatella Versace said she had never seen her as bad as she was during the MDNA Tour. I think she won't do stadiums for this reason alone. In the arena she can turn off the AC if it's too cold and she can charge a bit more and make up a bit for what it's lost for not doing stadiums since the Demand is there, but at least she doesn't get ****ed sick like she did on MDNA

true . Also her theatrical tours are ideal for arenas . A rock concert is for the stadiums where you can move around and go pee whenever.
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Ironic considering she was the first ever female to head up a stadium world tour in 1987.

She's almost 60, she doesn't want to get sick, at least that's what I think and it's understandable especially after she what she went through in the MDNA Tour. I've seen you. You never seem to agree with anyone and you often find ways to shade Madonna.

tumblr_numk4vOFM91qj28qwo2_r1_500.gif

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10 Things I Learned at Madonnas Rebel Heart Tour

http://www.slantmagazine.com/house/arti ... rt-tour/P1

1. Yes, Madonna can sing.

As her shows have increasingly required her to be hoisted, flung, and swung around in the air for close to two hours every night, Madonna has in recent years relied, perhaps too heavily, on lip-synching. But she can carry a tune far better than she's typically given credit for. Despite a mouthful of those pesky gold-and-diamond-encrusted grillz, she flawlessly serenaded old pal Debi Mazar, who stood in the audience singing along, with True Blue, and delivered an impassioned rendition of the blistering Rebel Heart ballad HeartBreakCity. Perched on the edge of a stage platform, playfully swinging her leg, she even belted out La Vie En Rose with relative ease.

2. Fifty-seven is the new 27.

At one point, Madonna dabbed her forehead with a towel and joked that sitting down to strum a toy guitar was her favorite part of the show, but she barely missed a beat or broke a sweat throughout the 21-song setlist. With her dirty-blond extensions cascading around her shoulders, dark roots exposed, fingerless gloves, and jewel-encrusted blazer and ankle boots, she was the spitting image of the title character from Desperately Seeking Susan, in which she made her big-screen debut an astonishing three decades ago.

3. Deeper and Deeper belongs among Madonnas classics.

With a catalogue as deep and wide as Madonna's, it would be easy for gems like Erotica's Deeper and Deeper to get lost to pop history. So it was a pleasant surprise to spot this one on the setlist and, aside from some amped-up EDM beats and a simplified flamenco guitar solo, hear it performed so faithfully.

4. Being Madonna (and working for her) is dangerous business.

As they say in Texas, everything is bigger on a Madonna tourincluding the liability and personal injury insurance policy. Coverage must include, but isn't limited to, performers being thrown off spiral staircases and tossed down giant LED screens, scaling and hanging precariously from poles, swinging back and forth from 10-foot stilts, and wearing capes with a recent history of violently yanking superstars to the ground from behind in front of an audience of millions.

5. Madonna really likes Candy Shop.

Though the Hard Candy opener was never released as a single, Madonna has a peculiar fondness for the track, having performed it during all of her last three tours. The singer's tenacity and obvious enthusiasm for the song has practically willed it into becoming a staple, fitting inconspicuously between her signature hits Music and Material Girl.

6. Madonna really hates Take a Bow.

Madge dusted off her '80s hits True Blue and Who's That Girl for the first time in 28 years. But some of her biggest '90s ballads, from This Used to Be My Playground to I'll Remember to Take a Bow (her longest running #1 hit ever), have still, to this day, never been performed on tour. Sure, they don't fit obviously into the pop star's latter-day dance-floor-driven output, but if the queen of reinvention isn't willing to find a way to put a new spin on these old chestnuts, there must be a good reason. With songs as timeless as these, it's just hard to imagine what that could possibly be.

7. Youre never too old to take a Holiday.

The only song to be performed during all or part of every Madonna tour aside from one, Holiday reclaimed its rightful place as the closing number during the Rebel Heart Tour. Over the years, Madonna's first bona fide smash has been reimagined as everything from a disco bauble to an ironic military march to an EDM banger, but while a Latin-style medley of Dress You Up, Into the Groove, and Lucky Star proves she isn't exactly becoming a purist, she refreshingly played it straight for her perennial call for a little celebration.

8. Madonna is more comfortable on stage than ever.

Madonna is a self-proclaimed showgirl, but despite a show clearly choreographed down to each flick of a wrist, she's never seemed more unscripted. From the call-and-response exchanges with the audience during an acoustic version of Who's That Girl to the addition of a new song to the setlist (a stirring, if pitchy, rendition of shoulda-been-a-sleeper-hit Ghosttown, which brought seemingly genuine tears to her eyes, a development that seemed to surprise even her), the Queen of Pop never looked so unguarded and at ease.

9. Madonna might be running out of ideas.

You'd be forgiven for thinking Madonna had already staged a show with scantily clad nuns twerking on cross-shaped stripper poles. From that perhaps too on-the-nose provocation to the multimedia prologue and guitar-wielding riot-grrrl shtick, Madonna seems to be recycling themes and concepts in ways that, while her contemporaries remained dogged in their adherence to formula, she managed to successfully avoid for the first few decades of her career.

10. But shes still the greatest performer of our time.

It's lonely at the top, but it ain't crowded, Madonna quipped, tongue in cheek, during a jazz-infused version of Music. As far back as 1990's iconic, game-changing Blond Ambition Tour, her shows have always been theatrical, blending traditional rock-concert tropes with narrative storytelling; Rebel Heart, though, takes it to another level, equal parts Cirque du Soleil, Broadway musical, and burlesquean immersive experience that redefines the meaning of maximalism.

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Madonna can do it all. She is a beautiful vocalist who puts so much feeling into her songs. Those screaming banshees who shout and show off their vocal ranges can't hold a candle to her - yes as a singer and as a stage entertainer. Plus her charisma, dancing, artistry and vision is above any pop star EVER. About time, she got the respect and accolades that she has always deserved.

:clap:

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She's almost 60, she doesn't want to get sick, at least that's what I think and it's understandable especially after she what she went through in the MDNA Tour. I've seen you. You never seem to agree with anyone and you often find ways to shade Madonna.

tumblr_numk4vOFM91qj28qwo2_r1_500.gif

Hang on i wasn't thowing shade at Madonna at all!!

Was just pointing out that she was the first to do stadium shows....im beyond pleased she's chosen to do a more intermert show and there are so many wonderful moments on RHT!

I thought MDNA in stadiums was awful....especially at Hyde Park it just didn't work at all.

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