Jump to content
MadonnaNation.com Forums

Rebel Heart Tour press reports, reviews, videos & pictures


Suedehead
 Share

Recommended Posts

US Magazine joining the chorus:

"...she’s still unbeatable in every regard as a pop star, with the show acting as a supreme victory lap through a venue she noted she had first performed in 30 years prior"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 860
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

That EW interview is positive but kind of weird. It never occurred to me she was in any way having a go at Taylor. And the arrangements of a lot of the older songs aren't that different from the original. This tour actually has more older material than some of her other tours. Plus, it doesn't seem to me all the stage banter is scripted because she does say different things at different concerts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The reviews for the tour are amazing and it seems that the album is finally getting the recognition it deserves. Also with Messiah and Rebel Heart on the set list I think it is safe to say that the deluxe is the proper version and not the standard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That EW interview is positive but kind of weird. It never occurred to me she was in any way having a go at Taylor. And the arrangements of a lot of the older songs aren't that different from the original. This tour actually has more older material than some of her other tours. Plus, it doesn't seem to me all the stage banter is scripted because she does say different things at different concerts.

its just someone who probably isn't a big fan and wants to add cynicism to the rave reception. ah well, this is nothing compared to what we've been used to. im eating all of this praise up because its so rare

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.villagevoice.com/music/madonnas-amy-schumer-ass-kicking-was-more-american-than-the-gop-debate-7666397

Last night at Madison Square Garden, a sold-out arena full of screaming, voguing, and otherwise beside-themselves fans opted to spend the evening with Madonna and Amy Schumer instead of taking in the latest Republican presidential debate. During a brief prerecorded voiceover at the start of the show, Madonna cried out a number of inspiring mantras rejecting various forces said to stifle creativity. Before she launched into "Iconic," the recording delivered a blow that would resonate over the course of her two-hour set: "I've got to start a revolution. Somebody's got to." Considering the political cacophony revving up on a different stage thousands of miles away at that very moment, Madonna and the Rebel Heart Tour were the perfect foil. Everyone present knew she belonged on that stage, and they'd gathered there to see pop's patron saint of revolution in action. And if revolution ain't American — especially one that banks on tradition and the accomplishments of glory days gone by, as the Rebel Heart Tour does — nothing is.

The name of the game of Madonna's Rebel Heart Tour — or its Madison Square Garden stops, anyway — isn't necessarily New, but Nostalgia. (She said so herself multiple times throughout the evening, referring to the performance she delivered on the same stage 30 years prior and shouting out members of the audience who were present for both MSG gigs.) Her Madgesty, Our Lady of Divine Reinvention, has changed everything from her gait to the genres she taps for inspiration with every passing album, from the rhinestone urban cowgirl stylings of Music to the cross-and-"Vogue"-bearing Like a Prayer to the lace-clad gyrations ofLike a Virgin and more. In the 32 years since the release of her self-titled debut, Madonna's biennial self-expression change-ups have become as dependable as the changing of the seasons, though recent forays like 2012's MDNA and her latest offering, Rebel Heart, see her enjoying experiments with current trends instead of pioneering them. For her, revolution is routine, and it's been that way from the start.

Dubstep breakdowns and intricately produced electronic explorations run rampant in the presentation of the Rebel Heart Tour, keeping the live show as closely married to her current musical aesthetic as possible. Classics receive the 2015 treatment in this fashion, with takes on "Material Girl" and "Like a Virgin" feeling far more suited for a dance floor in Ibiza than the time capsule of a jukebox. But these updates to some of the most beloved and controversial pop hits ever to light up the airwaves are just as much a testament to Madonna's ingenuity as anything else. She's got the catalog to pull from, and dressing up "Vogue" or any of yesteryear's singles in 2015 trappings proves that pop with teeth — framed by a lipstick-smeared smirk, naturally — doesn't dull over time.

madonna-flying-v-madison-square-garden-cEXPAND
Madonna plays a flying V onstage at Madison Square Garden, September 16, 2015.
Jason Speakman for the Village Voice

In that respect, maybe the Rebel Heart Tour isn't about New vs. Nostalgia, but a holy union of the two that only Madonna can consummate. Nothing about the first of Madonna's two MSG performances felt dated or stale. She kept up with her sensational dancers and navigated elaborate set changes with the skill of someone who's rolled up to sold-out stadiums for three decades. She grabbed a guitar for a few numbers and a ukulele for others, and floored the crowd with an especially intimate rendition of Édith Piaf's "La Vie en Rose," which she dedicated to New York City.

By this point in the night, Madonna had run through most ofRebel Heart's track list, a flamenco-infused take on "La Isla Bonita," and an explosive, Carnaval-channeling medley of "Dress You Up," "Into the Groove," and "Lucky Star." She'd battled her dancers with folding fans straight out of Mortal Kombat, slid across a table seemingly set for the Last Supper, mounted the hood of a Cadillac, and brought opener Amy Schumer out for a quick dance party and a literal ass-kicking, changing between leather getups and gilt capes and sequin-flecked matador jackets during the dizzying dance breaks. To whip the arena into a frenzy with an onslaught of multiple spectacles and then hypnotize it with the gorgeous simplicity of "La Vie en Rose" was to cut to the chase of Madonna's genius. The massive production and flashy antics are entertaining as hell and make up for the rare instance where she falters, either on her feet or with her words. But here, as she sat on the stage strumming the ukulele by herself, Madonna's voice was clear, calm, and comfortable. In that moment, no one could question the fact that this woman is more at home singing under the most intense spotlight on the planet than anyone else. The sheen of her platinum flapper frock may have blinded the first few rows, but her solitary presence — and her voice — stunned her audience on a level the hyper-controlled chaos couldn't touch.

Relevance is a topic frequently broached in pop, especially when its major female players are brought up in the conversation. Be it Lady Gaga or Beyoncé or Janet or Britney or Cher, these women — who count thousands of hits and little golden statues and venues toured between them — have returned to the drawing board countless times to chase the next hook and get people moving. Madonna has arrived at a place where she can rest on her laurels as easily as she can flip the script on the genre, free of the clutches of trend and the mercurial nature of the music industry that her peers and protégés have to acknowledge. It's her prerogative to lose herself in a Diplo- or Avicii-crafted beat if she chooses to do so, or hit fans with a rendition of "Material Girl" they never saw coming, or pull a Piaf standard out of her back pocket to keep them on their toes. The Rebel Heart Tour is a celebration of what she's accomplished, but it also serves as a reminder that she's content sitting in her throne as the reigning Queen of Pop. She needs a place to hang out when she's plotting her next potentially game-changing move. "It's lonely at the top!" she playfully cooed at one point. Her eyes narrowed, as did her tone. "But it ain't crowded."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am loving these reviews. I don't recall a time where she was praised this much by the media. And rightfully so. She's done everything right with this show and deserves all the praise. She's simply on another level and proves it so effortlessly. I can't wait to see it

Link to comment
Share on other sites

WOW! Her tours have generally received good reviews but never like this. With this show, everyone seems to agree that it's time to recognize that she's on a league of her own & that no one comes close. I already knew that but after seeing the show last night, I could see how even the cynics had to admit Madonna's undisputed superiority. The show was a tour de force on every level and it was really so much fun at the same time, from start to finish.

:clap::clap::bow:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"In that moment, no one could question the fact that this woman is more at home singing under the most intense spotlight on the planet than anyone else."

This might be one of the most accurate descriptions of the woman who might just go on being the most divisive and influential woman in the history of art and culture. Ever.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/18/arts/music/madonna-returns-to-the-garden-unapologetic-and-playful.html?_r=0

The New York Times

Madonna Returns to the Garden, Unapologetic and Playful

By JON PARELES

SEPT. 17, 2015

18MADONNA-blog427-v2.jpg

Madonna performed her many hits on Wednesday at Madison Square Garden . Credit Krista Schlueter for The New York Times



Madonna let fans see her sweat when her Rebel Heart tour started its two nights at Madison Square Garden on Wednesday. She belted HeartBreakCity, a bitter, accusatory breakup song, from a staircase as she battled the embraces of an acrobatic dancer. Then she tossed off a jacket to reveal a sweat-soaked blouse, and traded heartache for triumph with the first words I made it through the wilderness of Like a Virgin. She pranced and strutted through it with some moves from her 1980s videos and opened the blouse to reveal lingerie and cleavage. The lesson: Madonna the indomitable sexpot would prevail.

Thats undeniable. She mentioned, twice, that she first played Madison Square Garden 30 years ago, saying she felt nostalgic. But while much of her audience has grown up with her, Madonna, now 57, hasnt allowed herself to become an oldies act. She filled the set with songs from Rebel Heart, released this year, and thoroughly rearranged her early hits.

Through the decades, Madonnas tours have delivered spectacles that push hot buttons galore: sexuality, power, faith, rebellion and sheer willfulness. They were all part of the Rebel Heart show, too. But on this tour, Madonna isnt confronting her audience as much as sharing her prerogatives with it. The dance numbers go hopscotching through history and geography, reaching up in the air and across the arena, simply because they can.

Madonnas set opened with a recorded monologue about wanting to start a revolution; her voice warned about too much creativity being crushed beneath the will of corporate branding and whats trendy. She made her entrance inside a medieval-looking cage that she would break out of as she sang Iconic, a pep talk on self-realization for everyone, and then Bitch Im Madonna, a reminder with thundering dubstep bass drops that she stands apart. She commanded a troupe of dancers costumed like samurai warriors, defeating one in mock combat. Then, almost immediately, she was a rocker with a black Flying V guitar, playing Burning Up as something like a Joan Jett song.

She delivered the shows blasphemy quota early, with Holy Water, calling for oral sex amid bump-and-grind pole dancers wearing nuns headgear, and segueing into Vogue, with the dancers recasting the Last Supper as a bacchanal. Devil Pray about setting aside drugs for spirituality had her both genuflecting before a priest figure and grinding her hips.

18MADONNAJP-articleLarge.jpg

Madonna on Wednesday at Madison Square Garden. Dancers were big parts of the concert, along with her biggest hits. But she also pulled liberally from "Rebel Heart," her latest album. Credit Krista Schlueter for The New York Times

But then she set provocation aside. It was a friendlier Madonna who encouraged a singalong as she strummed a ukulele through True Blue. It was a frisky Madonna who danced through a simulated gas station, climbing on and off the mechanics, in Body Shop. It was a touristic Madonna who wore a long ruffled skirt and extended a flamenco version of La Isla Bonita into a Latin-flavored medley of early hits. An earnest Madonna exposed her voice in a solo rendition, with ukulele, of La Vie en Rose. And a suavely retro Madonna started Music as a chanteuses torch song before switching to its electronic beat and flaunting her skimpy rhinestone dress amid jitterbugging dancers.

Madonnas ire was reserved for an ex: in HeartBreakCity and in a version of Living for Love that traded the upbeat gospel of the single version for a brutal bass stomp, as she played matador with men wearing horns. She closed the main set with another jibe, but a more celebratory one: Unapologetic Bitch, which brought back the nights opener, the comedian Amy Schumer, to dance along and, with Madonnas help, flash her underwear.

But Madonna took care not to end on that angry note. She was back, dressed in the American flag, for Holiday, sounding like the 1983 original with pumped-up bass, inviting the world to dance a little nostalgic for once, but unstoppable.



A version of this review appears in print on September 18, 2015, on page C4 of the New York edition with the headline: Defiant, and Still a Spectacle. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another great review, from Time Out. I love the comparison to Frank Sinatra!

http://www.timeout.com/newyork/blog/seven-highlights-from-madonnas-concert-at-madison-square-garden-091715

Madonna has spent the year in a fog of bad press: leaked tracks from her new album, Rebel Heart, false rumors of low sales, relentless Internet debate about her age and behavior. Last night at Madison Square Garden, in the first show of her three-concert NYC engagement, she easily cleared the air with an eclectic and electrifying performance. After more than three decades, Madonna remains an authoritative diva, far from the end of her reign; she’s rarely seemed more natural and relaxed. Here are the night’s most memorable moments.

1. “Body Shop”/“True Blue”: The first section of the concert is devoted to an intense, goth pageant of songs from Rebel Heart (plus “Deeper and Deeper” from 1992’s Erotica), exploring sexual and spiritual themes that Madonna has been navigating for decades. It’s cool—and hot—but the audience lets out a collective sigh of pleasure when she switches to a bright, ’50s-greaser vibe for “Body Shop” from Rebel Heart. That's followed by a honey-sweet croon of the title track from 1986’s True Blue, with Madonna accompanying herself on the ukulele and radiating country warmth.

2. “Devil Pray”: An instant classic from the new album, with soothing chords reminiscent of the best tracks from 2003’s underrated American Life, this song quickly inspires the audience to sing along with its earworm chorus:

And we can do drugs and we can smoke weed and we can drink whiskey
Yeah, we can get high and we can get stoned
And we can sniff glue and we can do E and we can drop acid
Forever be lost with no way home

It’s a Dr. Feelgood testament to the strength of her current work.

3. “Like A Virgin”: Halfway through the show, the opening notes of the iconic title track from Like A Virgin(1984) begin to play, and Madonna is suddenly alone on stage in a short-sleeved gingham blouse, looking like the girl next door. It’s a stunning transformation. What follows is a masterfully simple song-and-dance number, performed without backup. It’s unlike any previous version, and it boldly illuminates the freshness at the song’s core and the attention-commanding frankness of her performing it.

4. “Music”: At one time, it was rumored Madonna would star in the film version of the Broadway musicalChicago. The hit title track from Music (2000) gives her the chance to deliver that Jazz Age–style razzmatazz in a shimmery black flapper dress adorned with thousands of Swarovski crystals. “Music” is a natural fit for this showbiz approach, and Madonna and her dancers bring down the house.

5. ’80s Hits Medley: As happy as the audience is to hear the early hits "Dress You Up,” "Into the Groove” and “Lucky Star,” this number is an unpolished misfire. Posing as a ragtag crew of players, Madonna and her ensemble call to mind an amalgamation of The Muppet Show and the Star Wars cantina. There’s too much going on, but they seem to be having so much fun that it’s hard not to smile.

6. “La Vie en Rose”: Madonna sings Edith Piaf? Oui, oui! Madonna accompanies herself on guitar and delivers a gorgeous acoustic vocal in French. Her rich, plaintive rendition suggest that she could probably pull off a whole set built around just her singing, without all the bells and whistles (and crosses and stripper poles and hotties and hydraulics).

7. “Rebel Heart”: Late in the show, Madonna sits on a stool at the end of her runway platform and admits to feeling nostalgic: She first played Madison Square Garden 30 years ago. Instead of launching into another oldie, though, she passionately sings her new album’s title track, imbuing it with an anthem-like quality. It has the feel of a personal statement, like Frank Sinatra’s “My Way”—the midcareer calling card of another music legend who conquered Madison Square Garden in his 50s and who remained an icon throughout era after era, shapeshifting to thrive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another great review, from Time Out. I love the comparison to Frank Sinatra!

http://www.timeout.com/newyork/blog/seven-highlights-from-madonnas-concert-at-madison-square-garden-091715

Madonna has spent the year in a fog of bad press: leaked tracks from her new album, Rebel Heart, false rumors of low sales, relentless Internet debate about her age and behavior. Last night at Madison Square Garden, in the first show of her three-concert NYC engagement, she easily cleared the air with an eclectic and electrifying performance. After more than three decades, Madonna remains an authoritative diva, far from the end of her reign; shes rarely seemed more natural and relaxed. Here are the nights most memorable moments.

1. Body Shop/True Blue: The first section of the concert is devoted to an intense, goth pageant of songs from Rebel Heart (plus Deeper and Deeper from 1992s Erotica), exploring sexual and spiritual themes that Madonna has been navigating for decades. Its cooland hotbut the audience lets out a collective sigh of pleasure when she switches to a bright, 50s-greaser vibe for Body Shop from Rebel Heart. That's followed by a honey-sweet croon of the title track from 1986s True Blue, with Madonna accompanying herself on the ukulele and radiating country warmth.

2. Devil Pray: An instant classic from the new album, with soothing chords reminiscent of the best tracks from 2003s underrated American Life, this song quickly inspires the audience to sing along with its earworm chorus:

And we can do drugs and we can smoke weed and we can drink whiskey

Yeah, we can get high and we can get stoned

And we can sniff glue and we can do E and we can drop acid

Forever be lost with no way home

Its a Dr. Feelgood testament to the strength of her current work.

3. Like A Virgin: Halfway through the show, the opening notes of the iconic title track from Like A Virgin(1984) begin to play, and Madonna is suddenly alone on stage in a short-sleeved gingham blouse, looking like the girl next door. Its a stunning transformation. What follows is a masterfully simple song-and-dance number, performed without backup. Its unlike any previous version, and it boldly illuminates the freshness at the songs core and the attention-commanding frankness of her performing it.

4. Music: At one time, it was rumored Madonna would star in the film version of the Broadway musicalChicago. The hit title track from Music (2000) gives her the chance to deliver that Jazz Agestyle razzmatazz in a shimmery black flapper dress adorned with thousands of Swarovski crystals. Music is a natural fit for this showbiz approach, and Madonna and her dancers bring down the house.

5. 80s Hits Medley: As happy as the audience is to hear the early hits "Dress You Up, "Into the Groove and Lucky Star, this number is an unpolished misfire. Posing as a ragtag crew of players, Madonna and her ensemble call to mind an amalgamation of The Muppet Show and the Star Wars cantina. Theres too much going on, but they seem to be having so much fun that its hard not to smile.

6. La Vie en Rose: Madonna sings Edith Piaf? Oui, oui! Madonna accompanies herself on guitar and delivers a gorgeous acoustic vocal in French. Her rich, plaintive rendition suggest that she could probably pull off a whole set built around just her singing, without all the bells and whistles (and crosses and stripper poles and hotties and hydraulics).

7. Rebel Heart: Late in the show, Madonna sits on a stool at the end of her runway platform and admits to feeling nostalgic: She first played Madison Square Garden 30 years ago. Instead of launching into another oldie, though, she passionately sings her new albums title track, imbuing it with an anthem-like quality. It has the feel of a personal statement, like Frank Sinatras My Waythe midcareer calling card of another music legend who conquered Madison Square Garden in his 50s and who remained an icon throughout era after era, shapeshifting to thrive.

Spot on! Especially about DEVIL PRAY! :wow:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

another day another 5 stars

http://www.digitaljournal.com/a-and-e/music/review-madonna-masterful-at-madison-square-garden-in-new-york-city/article/444118

Review: Madonna masterful at Madison Square Garden in New York City SPECIAL
By Markos Papadatos 7 hours ago in Music
New York - On September 16, pop superstar Madonna performed at New York's Madison Square Garden, and she put on a spectacular concert.
After a witty opening set from acclaimed comedian Amy Schumer, the pop queen began her elaborate set with a noteworthy version of "Iconic," which was a true work of art. "All right, New York, are you with me?" Madonna screamed, and it is safe to say that she had her New York fans in the palm of her hand.
She continued with "Bitch I'm Madonna," where rapper Nicki Minaj appeared on a televised screen through the help of modern technology. "Are you ready to burn this place down?" Madonna asked, prior to breaking into "Burning Up."
Her dancers were dressed as nuns for "Holy Water" and she delivered a seductive performance on poles that were reminiscent of crucifixes. She incorporated a medley of her smash hit "Vogue" towards the end of the performance, which resonated well with her fans in "The Big Apple."
She sang "Devil Pray" while being tied up, backed by acoustic instruments, as an ethereal version of "Messiah" played in the background through a video screen, where the pop songstress looked as gorgeous as ever.
Madonna turned her stage into an auto body shop, with a car prop and loads of tires, for a grand scale performance of "Body Shop." "I'm not as funny as Amy Schumer, but I'm trying. Wasn't she amazing," Madonna said, praising her opening act.
"Are you having a good time, New York?" she asked, prior to saying a few curse words. "You can't play New York without swearing a lot. She shared that her following song, which she co-wrote, has no swear words, and she went on to deliver a stunning, acoustic rendition of "True Blue," which garnered her a standing ovation.
"Are you ready to go deeper?" Madonna asked, prior to breaking into a soaring performance of "Deeper and Deeper," which was followed by "Heart Break City," which was juxtaposed with "Love Don't Live Here Anymore."
She took her fans on a trip down memory lane with such classics as "Like a Virgin" and "Justify My Love," as well as "Living for Love," her newest song from Rebel Heart CD. Equally impressive were her angelic versions of "La Isla Bonita," "Dress You Up," "Into the Groove" and "Lucky Star," all of which left her audience in total awe of her timelessness and relevance in the music industry.
Madonna stripped "Who's That Girl" down to a raw and authentic, acoustic performance, while she changed the pace with her mega hits "Music," the sassy "Candy Shop" and her signature tune, "Material Girl," which was perhaps the highlight vocal of the evening.
She paid homage to the late French songstress Edith Piaf with a ukulele rendition of "La Vie En Rose," which was sheer perfection, prior to closing with her spitfire "Unapologetic Bitch," which ended in a raucous applause. For her encore, Madonna ended her lengthy set on an uplifting note with another classic, "Holiday."
"Madonna always puts on the greatest show on Earth," exclaimed Vaggelis Samaras, Madonna fan and attendee.
The Verdict
Overall, Madonna's "Rebel Heart" tour stop at New York's Madison Square Garden was utterly fantastic. The New York crowd was well aware that they were in the presence of a true musical goddess. It is no wonder that she is the best-selling female artist of all time. She constantly proves that she is able to reinvent herself decade after decade, while keeping her music fresh and unique. Madonna possessed the voice of an angel, and this is one show that should not be missed. It should be on every music fan's bucket list. Her Madison Square Garden show garnered 5 out of 5 stars.


Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/a-and-e/music/review-madonna-masterful-at-madison-square-garden-in-new-york-city/article/444118#ixzz3m408o2vn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share


×
×
  • Create New...