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MADONNA on the COVER of ROLLING STONE!!!!

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I'll never understand why Madonna fans (not you voguemusic) subject themselves to social media torture. It's only gonna depress you. Get rid of it.

This! :clap:

Social medias are full of hate, and it's not only toward Madonna but any subject... It's better to ignore it!

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Do you think about mortality?

In some respects I will never die. Because art is immortal. What we leave behind and what we create - the energy that we put out into the world is eternal. The physical body is assembled just like a chair or a building or a flower, but the revolutions we start, the people we affect and inspire, that is eternal. So, in that respect, we do achieve immortality, and that makes me less fearful.

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Do you still enjoy provocation? Even now?

Um, yeah (laughs). Would you like me to provoke you? I mean, you're not asking that question because you don't know the answer, right?

Well, there was a time when you were talking as if you'd left that in the past.

Really? Did I say that? I think there was probably a time when I was less provocative. That's when I was married. Yeah.

I didn't make that linkage.

Yeah, make that linkage (laughs).

What was it about that marriage that made you feel that way?

Well, I don't think my ex-husband approved of it. Or maybe he didn't understand it. I don't think he understood my provocation. He was not a fan of me kissing Britney Spears onstage, for instance. Was that provocative? I think it was. I mean, now it wouldn't be.

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Sorry Pud but I have to steal your catchphrase:

MORE! MORE!!! MORE!!!!

Beautiful answers already. Might have to buy the darn thing.

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Do you think about mortality?

In some respects I will never die. Because art is immortal. What we leave behind and what we create - the energy that we put out into the world is eternal. The physical body is assembled just like a chair or a building or a flower, but the revolutions we start, the people we affect and inspire, that is eternal. So, in that respect, we do achieve immortality, and that makes me less fearful.

:dramatic:

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There was a dance teacher in high school, Christopher Flynn, who was very important in your life. Was he anything like (J.K Simmons' character in "Whiplash").

Oh, yeah. He was brutal. He was ruthless, and he walked around with a stick and he hit you with it. He would say kind of outrageous things: "Don't come to my room and stand like that. Get out of here." He would not tolerate laziness or complaining. He did a lot of things like that guy in the movie. But when you did something right, he did feed you compliments, once in a while. He's the one who said to me, "You have to get out of this place. You have a gift. Go to New York."

If you had never gone to that class, would your path had been completely different?

Well, things would be very different if lots of other things didn't happen to me. If my mother didn't die and I grew up with a feeling of wholeness and completeness and family, I probably would have stayed in Michigan and become a schoolteacher...

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I posted scans in the "Madonna's image this era" forum if anyone wants to look! I didn't see this thread till after. :madonna2:

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Do you keep journals? Do you write poetry that no one reads?

Yeah, both. Actually, one of my assistants just found one of my journals from 1991. I'm complaining the same way about not being able to sleep in 1991 as I am right now. Like, some things never change.So that was, in a way, reassuring.

You were saying the same thing in the Eighties. When did the insomnia start?

Unconsciously, probably when my mother died. And sleep's never been an easy thing for me.

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More books are neatly stacked on the cream-colored coffee table, which precisely matches the couch - Gay New York, Luc Sante's Low Life, Curtis Sittenfeld's novel Sisterland. Alongside them is a set of black binders filled with photographs - references for a movie she plans to direct, based on the 2013 novel The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells.

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Do you think about mortality?

In some respects I will never die. Because art is immortal. What we leave behind and what we create - the energy that we put out into the world is eternal. The physical body is assembled just like a chair or a building or a flower, but the revolutions we start, the people we affect and inspire, that is eternal. So, in that respect, we do achieve immortality, and that makes me less fearful.

And again, tears

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Madonna returns to the cover of Rolling Stone in our latest issue (on stands Friday) giving her most revealing, introspective and fiery interview in years. In the in-depth Q&A with senior writer Brian Hiatt, Madonna discusses her real feelings about Lady Gaga, her marriage to Guy Ritchie, her relationship with Judaism, her assessment of Kanye West, her love for Whiplash and much more.

"I don't think she wants my crown," Madonna says, referring to Gaga. "We live in a world where people like to pit women against each other. And this is why I love the idea of embracing other females who are doing what I'm doing. . .The only time I ever criticized Lady Gaga was when I felt like she blatantly ripped off one of my songs. It's got nothing to do with 'she's taking my crown' or 'she's in some space of mine.' She has her thing. I do think she's a very talented singer and songwriter. It was just that one issue. And everybody's obviously running with it and turned it into a huge feud, which I think is really boring, quite frankly. And you know what? I don't care anymore. Here's the thing: one day everyone's going to shut up about it. You'll see! I have a plan. "

But Madonna, who will release her new album Rebel Heart on March 6th (read our review of the album here), reserves her most passionate and eloquent remarks for the topic of ageism, in pop writing and in society. "It's still the one area where you can totally discriminate against somebody," she says, "and talk shit. Because of their age. Only females, though. Not males. So in that respect we still live in a very sexist society."

"No one would dare to say a degrading remark about being black or dare to say a degrading remark on Instagram about someone being gay," Madonna continues. "But my age – anybody and everybody would say something degrading to me. And I always think to myself, why is that accepted? What's the difference between that and racism, or any discrimination? They're judging me by my age. I don't understand. I'm trying to get my head around it. Because women, generally, when they reach a certain age, have accepted that they're not allowed to behave a certain way. But I don't follow the rules. I never did, and I'm not going to start."

And if you're wondering if there was a message behind showing off her bare butt on the Grammys' red carpet: "This is what a 56-year-old ass looks like, motherfuckers!" she says. And to the suggestion that her awe-inspiring physique isn't exactly average, she retorts, "You know what? It could be the average some day! That's the thing."

"When I did my sex book, it wasn't the average," Madonna says. "When I performed 'Like a Virgin' on the MTV Awards and my dress went up and my ass was showing, it was considered a total scandal. It was never the average, and now it's the average. When I did Truth or Dare and the cameras followed me around, it was not the average. So if I have to be the person who opens the door for women to believe and understand and embrace the idea that they can be sexual and look good and be as relevant in their fifties or their sixties or whatever as they were in their twenties, then so be it."

Look for the issue on stands and in the iTunes App Store this Friday, February 27th.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/madonna-fights-back-inside-rolling-stones-new-issue-20150225#ixzz3SmV0UrAm

Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

For being unique and revolutionary, it has never been or will ever be easy for her. We know she gets hurt because it's on her songs, but she's never one to back down or give up. When all her detractors are dusts, her voice and actions will still be heard, inspire and be revered. Time will prove to be her friend. I know this.

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The interview was a fantastic read. Thanks for the scans.

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"Like A Prayer producer Nile Rodgers". That's a pretty major clanger for a music mag to make!

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Thank you so much for the scans ;)

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Thank you! It was an interesting read.

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No problem you guys!! Mwah!

Thank you! :kiss2:

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Thank you soooo much! Definitely getting a copy. That interview is anthological (though I would have loved to know more about the album).

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Guest Rocco Papa

I got my copy today. I'm so glad she's doing magazine covers this era. That was one of the main disappointments during the MDNA era. And the interview is great too. Very candid. I like how they just transcribed the interview and laid it out instead of pulling out certain quotes for the article. No BS, straight to the point.

But, I swear, this magazine gets smaller and thinner every time I get one. It's crazy.

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