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Lol I WISH that was me :(. It's Mariano Ontanon, my future husband.

hahahah yeah i thought that ;) i meant the poster before you when I saw his twitter pic ;)

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His review is not overly negative, but it's a shame about the letter grade. He really seems to like half of the tracks.

If any of you are expressing discontent with any critics on twitter, facebook, or other forums, please keep calm and rational, don't curse, and play nice. We don't want M's fans getting a reputation as nasty.

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His review is not overly negative, but it's a shame about the letter grade. He really seems to like half of the tracks.

If any of you are expressing discontent with any critics on twitter, facebook, or other forums, please keep calm and rational, don't curse, and play nice. We don't want M's fans getting a reputation as nasty.

This!! I am against name calling or attacking people as well!

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I love reading music reviews and follow them often as a compass to what I should maybe pay attention too and see it as a service to people who are lovers of music.

My point is that a music critic is responsible for supporting his opinion with some demonstration of knowledge of musical composition and clarity of discourse while doing so. This review is just non-sensical and pure masturbation. And anyone can do that.

PS: Thank you Nikki :rhodri:

Edited by tombigbee
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When push comes to shove, reviews are simply one person's opinion. I hate unprofessional reviews where it is obvious the person reviewing either an album, movie or concert has pre-conceived dislike for someone or has obviously not properly listened to the music in much context. Then their review becomes sloppy and unprofessional. I do enjoy and appreciate reading reviews of people who take them seriously and are professional but I take their opinions as not fact but simply their opinions. Not worth getting worried about.

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When push comes to shove, reviews are simply one person's opinion. I hate unprofessional reviews where it is obvious the person reviewing either an album, movie or concert has pre-conceived dislike for someone or has obviously not properly listened to the music in much context. Then their review becomes sloppy and unprofessional. I do enjoy and appreciate reading reviews of people who take them seriously and are professional but I take their opinions as not fact but simply their opinions. Not worth getting worried about.

That was my problem with the W.E. reviews.

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That was my problem with the W.E. reviews.

Heavens yes, so many "reviewers" spent the first half of their review trashing Madonna herself. By the time they mentioned the film itself, you already knew they were going to hate it. It it disappointing and wrong when some people are paid to review things and are so obviously biased and unprofessional. There are so many wonderful reviewers around who should be employed instead - people who generally love music and movies and take the time and effort to review things properly.

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And as for metacritic, yes it's a tool that some people use as a guide, as someone pointed out a while back. But there seems to be this air of mystery about them. Why, for example, is a widely circulated and seemingly reputable publication like USA Today not counted, but some lesser known and arguably fan base oriented online magazines are. Who knows what their reasoning or formula is, and it's highly unlikely they let us in on it anytime soon.

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How many more reviews can we expect for this album? I thought around 30-35 like MDNA by the end of the release week. What do you think?

She should still definitely be reviewed by Billboard, Entertainment Weekly, The Guardian, All Music Guide, Pitchfork, NME, Chicago Tribune, Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, PopMatters, and Drowned In Sound.

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She should still definitely be reviewed by Billboard, Entertainment Weekly, The Guardian, All Music Guide, Pitchfork, NME, Chicago Tribune, Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, PopMatters, and Drowned In Sound.

ew drowned in sound.. i clicked on a few albums for reviews and they're always the one giving most albums the most negative score. think they hate everything

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ew drowned in sound.. i clicked on a few albums for reviews and they're always the one giving most albums the most negative score. think they hate everything.

And Pitchfork!

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ew drowned in sound.. i clicked on a few albums for reviews and they're always the one giving most albums the most negative score. think they hate everything

I think her best shots for good-great reviews still to come are Boston Globe (raved about the first six songs), PopMatters (raved about the first six), the Guardian if Caroline Sullivan does the review, Billboard (generally positive), and All Music Guide (generally positive). EW could go either way, they have been nasty to her lately. Pitchfork will most likely be negative.

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pitchfork have their love for beyonce though. they sometimes come up with something positive when all reviews are negative etc. i think they just troll (except for their fav. bey) but drowned in sound seems negative (really negative) almost for all albums

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just 2 4 or 4.5 stars would be nice, so it's in the 70s and it is in a safe zone for when drownedinsound and pitchfork come to troll

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just 2 4 or 4.5 stars would be nice, so it's in the 70s and it is in a safe zone for when drownedinsound and pitchfork come to troll

Yes. We need solid reviews if we want average score above 70. "Rebel Heart" deserves it!

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I don't expect a good review from Pitchfork - they HATE Madonna. EW are extremely harsh on M too.

Yes, they hate Madonna and adore Ariana Grande. Pathetic indie site.

http://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/19765-ariana-grande-my-everything/

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"Madonna is indestructible, transcendent of age, an incandescent avatar of pop, a Zelig-like figure who criss crosses modern history. -- She is superhuman, ageless, and the fascination with her fall wasn’t so much to do with her age but because there is something fundamentally incongruous about her falling over, like Superman stubbing his toe or Jesus waking up with a hangover.

And certainly the idea of Madonna as an indestructible spirit of pop runs rampant through her mostly excellent thirteenth studio album Rebel Heart, a record whose strengths are timeless and whose faults are somewhat more modern." (Drowned in Sound)

That was a pretty good review and they didn't have almost anything bad to say about Madonna. :sassy:

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https://twitter.com/ptabakis/status/571796959373225985

Unfortunately the reviewer from Pretty Much Amazing (counts for metacritic) is going to give the album a bad review. Guess what? He's a Little Monster who has dissed M on Twitter. Shocking. :mellow:

So, this is what Pretty Much Amazing has to say


At its best, Rebel Heart has an ease, and a long absent softness, qualities sorely missed since her last masterwork Music. For every godawful moment, which come and go with a sad frequency on Rebel Heart, there are glimmers of virtuosity buried within the overworked mess. Or, to be more accurate, when taken in full (i.e., the 25 tracks found on the bloated “SuperDeluxe” edition) a solid comeback album is left behind after Madonna has chucked her disparate ideas and collaborations, willy nilly, at the wall. If she can no longer perform the role of a canny and thoughtful curator — once her greatest talent, now absent — the listener can, at least, excavate something to remember.
The album needs a scalpel’s touch. I’ll take the first stab.
My edit of Rebel Heart would open with the tender piano chords of “Wash All Over Me.” It’s a song filled with rolling drums, ethereal vocal overdubs, and some much needed self-doubt, and on the standard edition, it’s the album closer. Then I’d bring in “Rebel Heart,” the excellent title track that somehow isn’t even included in the standard edition, with its powerful declaration, “Hell yeah, this is me/ right where I’m supposed to be.” Next I’d place two real highlights: first, “Ghosttown,” a phenomenal post-apocalyptic love song, followed immediately by “Living for Love,” Madonna’s best single since “Hung Up.” The mid-tempo “Inside Out,” with its string-and-beat cool, would come next, a transition to Madonna in full ballad glory. The acoustic beauty of “Joan of Arc” and the naked honesty of “HeartBreakCity” give way to the equally soft, if goofy, “Body Shop.” No Madonna record would be complete without religious imagery. “Messiah” (also missing from the standard edition) and “Devil Pray” both capably check that box. And finally, we conclude with two worthy “SuperDeluxe” cuts: “Beautiful Scars,” a disco-lite throwback, and “Graffiti Heart,” a galloping love letter to creativity. And there it is: twelve tracks, 47 minutes. This would stand as a solid B+ Madonna LP, fitting snugly alongside her finest works.
But this album doesn’t exist.
If only someone had been there to say, “No, Madonna, bad idea,” to excise the dreck. Why, for example, are “Unapologetic Bitch,” “Illuminati,” and “Bitch, I’m Madonna” included on any iteration of Rebel Heart? Alas, they’re on the standard edition, and are, thus, canonical. That vile trio should promptly be marched into Mordor and tossed into the mouth of Mount Doom. Some not-so-terrific cuts have their own appeal, even if it isn’t musical: from a psychological standpoint, at least, “Iconic” and “Veni Vidi Vici” are fun, if desperate, clouds of narcissistic puffery. “Holy Water” and “S.E.X.” provide gasoline for Madonna’s ageist haters, but there’s something for everyone, or no one, here. On “Holy Water” we have to hear her sing, “Yeezus loves my pussy best” – like hearing your parents having sex, it’s embarrassing, gross, and all too hard to forget.
I uncovered an intensely personal, hugely enjoyable, and lovingly executed album from the wreckage of Rebel Heart’s too many versions and too many tracks. But that’s not my job. On the album’s title track, Madonna sings “Oh no, I want more/ That’s not what I’m looking for.” If only she’d given us less. That’s what I’m looking for. C+
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So, this is what Pretty Much Amazing has to say

At its best, Rebel Heart has an ease, and a long absent softness, qualities sorely missed since her last masterwork Music. For every godawful moment, which come and go with a sad frequency on Rebel Heart, there are glimmers of virtuosity buried within the overworked mess. Or, to be more accurate, when taken in full (i.e., the 25 tracks found on the bloated SuperDeluxe edition) a solid comeback album is left behind after Madonna has chucked her disparate ideas and collaborations, willy nilly, at the wall. If she can no longer perform the role of a canny and thoughtful curator once her greatest talent, now absent the listener can, at least, excavate something to remember.

The album needs a scalpels touch. Ill take the first stab.

My edit of Rebel Heart would open with the tender piano chords of Wash All Over Me. Its a song filled with rolling drums, ethereal vocal overdubs, and some much needed self-doubt, and on the standard edition, its the album closer. Then Id bring in Rebel Heart, the excellent title track that somehow isnt even included in the standard edition, with its powerful declaration, Hell yeah, this is me/ right where Im supposed to be. Next Id place two real highlights: first, Ghosttown, a phenomenal post-apocalyptic love song, followed immediately by Living for Love, Madonnas best single since Hung Up. The mid-tempo Inside Out, with its string-and-beat cool, would come next, a transition to Madonna in full ballad glory. The acoustic beauty of Joan of Arc and the naked honesty of HeartBreakCity give way to the equally soft, if goofy, Body Shop. No Madonna record would be complete without religious imagery. Messiah (also missing from the standard edition) and Devil Pray both capably check that box. And finally, we conclude with two worthy SuperDeluxe cuts: Beautiful Scars, a disco-lite throwback, and Graffiti Heart, a galloping love letter to creativity. And there it is: twelve tracks, 47 minutes. This would stand as a solid B+ Madonna LP, fitting snugly alongside her finest works.

But this album doesnt exist.

If only someone had been there to say, No, Madonna, bad idea, to excise the dreck. Why, for example, are Unapologetic Bitch, Illuminati, and Bitch, Im Madonna included on any iteration of Rebel Heart? Alas, theyre on the standard edition, and are, thus, canonical. That vile trio should promptly be marched into Mordor and tossed into the mouth of Mount Doom. Some not-so-terrific cuts have their own appeal, even if it isnt musical: from a psychological standpoint, at least, Iconic and Veni Vidi Vici are fun, if desperate, clouds of narcissistic puffery. Holy Water and S.E.X. provide gasoline for Madonnas ageist haters, but theres something for everyone, or no one, here. On Holy Water we have to hear her sing, Yeezus loves my pussy best like hearing your parents having sex, its embarrassing, gross, and all too hard to forget.

I uncovered an intensely personal, hugely enjoyable, and lovingly executed album from the wreckage of Rebel Hearts too many versions and too many tracks. But thats not my job. On the albums title track, Madonna sings Oh no, I want more/ Thats not what Im looking for. If only shed given us less. Thats what Im looking for. C+

The grade makes no sense at all given the reviewer apparently loves the majority of the tracks. What an odd review

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