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http://www.liberation.fr/depeches/01012398040-madonna-exorcise-son-douloureux-divorce-sur-l-album-de-son-retour-mdna

Madonna exorcises her painful divorce on his return from the album "MDNA"

PARIS (AFP) - shaken by the arrival of Lady Gaga and Lana del Rey, Madonna confirmed she is still the "queen of pop" with the punchy "MDNA" twelfth studio album already acclaimed on which the star of 53 years exorcises his painful divorce.

Madonna had not released an album since "Hard Candy" in 2008, a disc sounds very urban tepidly received.

Since new people have disrupted the small world of pop, cheerfully plundering the legacy of the "Material Girl": Rihanna for the erotic side, Lana del Rey to Hollywood glamor and especially Lady Gaga for the taste for provocation and the ability to constantly renew its image.

At the announcement of the publication of "MDNA", many observers have questioned Madonna was still able to dictate the trend?

The first signs were hardly reassuring: the first single "Gimme all you luvin '" not as successful as hoped, her performance at halftime of the Super Bowl has generated mixed reviews.

Even her promotional pictures have caused a flurry of comments on the unkind inability to assume the star's age.

But the first reviews of "MDNA" published in the Anglo-Saxon press is unanimous.

"Madonna is still the queen of pop. Nearly 30 years after reaching for the first time the top of the charts, it shows how she always did the job," the U.S. magazine Billboard.

"Her new album shows the young pretenders that Madonna is still a force to be reckoned with," said Britain's Daily Mirror.

As usual, the diva was surrounded by employees chosen with flair and precision.

Inviting them to sing on two tracks, the star dubs as heirs two artists sharp: the rapper Nicki Minaj crazy and provocative MIA.

On the production side, she appealed to the French DJ Martin Solveig and Italian production duo Benny Benassi and Alle, specialists tubes cut to the clubs.

"MDNA" also marks the return - highly anticipated after twelve years of absence - producer William Orbit, the source of her creative renewal in 1998 with the introspective "Ray of Light".

These choices reflect the double message of the disc.

On the one hand, hymns to the pleasures of life and the night ("MDNA" is also a play on words with MDMA, a drug popular with clubbers). Version of pop or dance, they are often successful, but not surprised.

The other, a return to the painful divorce of Madonna, separated in 2008 by director Guy Ritchie.

It is this theme, treated sometimes by ballads sometimes by aggressive urban music, which gives all its flesh "MDNA".

Unvarnished, the singer recalls her sentence ("Wake up, ex-wife / This is your life"), bitterness ("I tried to be your wife / I reduced / I plastered my light "), her desire for revenge.

"Gang Bang", the title of the most amazing album, could serve as a soundtrack to a Quentin Tarantino movie. "Bang bang, I killed you / I shot in the head of my lover," she sings, icy.

"There is something remarkable about Madonna's decision to share her pain as she once shared her pleasure. Her music has always called for freedom from oppression, but for the first time is internal oppression," said Rolling Stone.

"MDNA", her first album for Interscope, a subsidiary of Universal, was released Monday. In France, it is available for free streaming on the internet until Sunday.

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Guest groovyguy

http://www.newsday.com/entertainment/music/drops-madonna-still-on-top-with-mdna-1.3620167

Drops: Madonna still on top with 'MDNA'

Published: March 23, 2012

By GLENN GAMBOA glenn.gamboa@newsday.com

Throw in the fact that Madonna clearly still has unresolved feelings about her divorce from director Guy Ritchie -- and is willing to openly discuss them -- and "MDNA" not only becomes her most interesting album since 1998's "Ray of Light," but her most artistically fearless album since 1989's "Like a Prayer."

There is no filler here, no unrealized potential. Each song on "MDNA" is part of Madonna's internal argument about her future as a pop star, an artist, a wife and a woman. And over the course of an hour or so, they all try to hash it out.

MADONNA

"MDNA"

GRADE A

BOTTOM LINE Madonna expresses herself

:clap:

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Guest LeJazzHot!

Boston Globe Review: Madonna sticks to her guns on 'MDNA'

What’s your favorite flavor of Madonna?

As is usually the case, there are several to choose from on “MDNA,’’ the pop icon’s new release, out Monday.

The one that Madonna seems to have been pushing in the run-up to her album’s release is the most familiar: queen of the dance floor, here to help us boogie our, and more crucially her own, troubles away.

From “Everybody’’ to “Into the Groove’’ to “Music,’’ Madonna has successfully helped us surrender to the transporting catharsis of moving to the beat for nearly 30 years.

So the two test balloon singles sent out as precursors probably felt like sure things, and yet neither was promising. First there was the irritating branding jingle “Give Me All Your Luvin’,’’ with its cheerleading reminder that we “L-U-V’’ Madonna. The more recent “Girl Gone Wild’’ imagines setting a fire but barely generates smoke - it’s an anonymous Ibiza-targeted jam that could have come from anyone from Rihanna to Jennifer Lopez.

It is the same 808 drumbeat she’s been churning out for her last few spins around the club, 2008’s “Hard Candy’’ and 2005’s “Confessions on a Dance Floor.’’ For the diehard members of Madonna’s core fan base, who remain hung up on every little thing that she says or does, that will be just fine.

But, like the drug to which it alludes, a chunk of “MDNA’’ feels more like a pre-fabricated high, one cooked up in a chem lab with collaborators old (William Orbit) and new (Benny Benassi, M.I.A., and Martin Solveig). The often chilly bloodlessness of the buzzing, shimmering, glistening, burping, tremulous synths and her distant, disaffected, reverb-heavy vocals raise a wall between the sentiment of ecstatic celebration and the actual practice of it - it takes some work from the listener to warm them up. Sometimes the album strains to be vibrant, but is merely uptempo.

And a few, like the silly, sing-song trifle “B-Day Song’’ and the bubbly cliche-ridden “I’m Addicted’’ and “Turn Up the Radio’’ feel a lot like filler to justify a “deluxe’’ configuration of the record.

“MDNA’’ isn’t a perfect Madonna album, but it greatly surpasses its immediate predecessors when Madonna cracks that hard candy shell and allows us to get at the gooey emotional center: This is a Madonna who is angry, mournful, occasionally funny, and most of all, specific - at one point, she raps about not having a prenup.

This is a Madonna who is not just sticking to her guns, but unloading them. Sometimes at herself, sometimes at her critics, and, presumably on several pointed songs, at her ex-husband, film director Guy Ritchie.

“I [Expletive] Up’’ dials back the volume and tempo but ratchets up the drama over martial drums and acoustic guitars, as she laments the woulda-coulda-shouldas and owns both her missteps and her “big mouth.’’ (But in admirably Madonna-esque fashion, she claims nobody makes mistakes better than she does.)

But if she is contrite there - and actually recites “Act of Contrition’’ elsewhere in one of “MDNA’’s several religious nods - on “I Don’t Give A,’’ (which features Nicki Minaj) she’s not so sorry: “I tried to be a good girl/ I tried to be your wife/ Diminished myself/ And I swallowed my light/ I tried to become all/ That you expect of me/ And if it was a failure/ I don’t give a . . .’’

(Interestingly, “Act of Contrition’’ isn’t the only callback to Madonna’s past. There are several echoes and allusions to previous songs, including “Lucky Star,’’ “Like a Virgin,’’ “Material Girl,’’ and even “Hanky Panky.’’)

She saves most of her ammunition to unleash on the scathing, superbly titled “Love Spent.’’ Opening with a burbling banjo and segueing into an irresistible marriage of string orchestration and menacing grooves, she worries in retrospect about someone’s romantic motives: “You had all of me, you wanted more/ Would you have married me if I were poor?/ Guess if I was your treasury/ You’d have found the time to treasure me.’’

While some of the album feels alienatingly icy, “Falling Free’’ earns its cool breeze. Co-written by, among others, Madonna’s supremely talented brother-in-law, singer-songwriter Joe Henry, it is a more impressionistic, haunting look at connection featuring one of the best vocals here.

And before it devolves into an awkward repetition of the word “bitch,’’ the rage of “Gang Bang,’’ with its fidgety, fuzzy, Morse code groove, bleeds bright red as Madonna envisions a violent end to the one who did her dirty: “And then I discovered, it couldn’t get worse/ You were building my coffin/ You were driving my hearse.’’

(The album comes in several different configurations, ranging from 11 to 18 tracks. They include a deluxe model, an iTunes exclusive, and a “clean’’ version for Wal-Mart that deletes the tracks “Gang Bang’’ and “I [Expletive] Up.’’)

These songs represent the Madonna of “Oh Father’’ and “Something to Remember’’ and “Don’t Tell Me’’ (also co-written by Henry).

The songs that find her venturing beyond lazy sloganeering and mechanized approximations of joy and into more personal and abstract territory gain power through storytelling, pathos, and smaller strokes of the brush, often without sacrificing the backbeat.

While there is plenty of fun to be had in the primal thumps of the better dance tracks here, it is this more vulnerable Madonna that inspires L-U-V, the one who gets down to the DNA of “MDNA.’’

-Sarah Rodman

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:manson:

What is she supposed to do at the age of 53? :manson:

Sitting on a wheelchair playing a guitar singing acoustic version of Justify My Love? :manson:

Even if she did that this Telegraph bitch would probably say " Oh I miss the old Madonna. The Fun Madonna. The Controversial Madonna ." Blah Blah Blah.

Madonna always does what she wants . If she wants to dress young and that makes her happy & continue to make GREAT POP MUSIC LIKE MDNA then I'm cool with it .

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MDNA,' Madonna's great new CD, is an exhilarating return to her pop-dance past

Album is loaded with upbeat songs like 'Give Me All Your Luvin' ' and 'Superstar'

Powered by Inform

Madonna by Mert + Marcus.

5 STARS

The 53-year-old superstar turns back the clock on her latest disc.

On her latest CD, Madonna chirps through a rash of odes to puppy love, blows out the biggest bubblegum song of her career (“Give Me All Your Luvin’”), and corrals the whole disc under a title that cheekily refers to a hallucinogenic drug.

Do these sound like the moves of a 53-year-old mother of four to you?

In fact, much of “MDNA” — out Tuesday — has more the flip zip of a disc by Katy Perry or Ke$ha than something by a woman who may be older than both their mothers. Then again, we are talking about Madonna, a woman who, at this point, seems just as hellbent on giving the finger to expectations about age that she once gave to assumptions about sex.

That stance alone might be enough to give Madonna’s youthful channelings a sense of defiance rather than desperation. But the music itself is what makes her flagrant act of regression not embarrassing but both pointed and exciting.

“MDNA” expands on the best elements of Madonna’s last CD, 2008’s “Hard Candy,” her most easily embraced disc since her very first. For “Candy,” the singer abandoned her least attractive feature — her self-importance. Finally, Madonna stopped marring her albums with songs meant to educate us about starving children, world politics or (gag) spiritual growth. Instead, she gave fans what they wanted all along: pitched dance anthems that doubled as smart pop songs.

Once again, upbeat tracks dominate “MDNA.” The sole ballad, the droopy “Masterpiece,” comes from another source: the soundtrack to the Madonna-directed bomb of a film “W.E.” Better, Maddy has ditched that post-“Evita”/post-elocution-lessons voice to sing again like either a snotty or an ironically innocent imp. In “Turn Up the Radio,” she sounds blissfully infantile. In “Girl Gone Wild,” she plays teen bad girl with nutty verisimilitude.

It helps that the songs themselves have so much snap coursing through them. “I’m Addicted” and “Some Girls” have the dark disco élan of druggier dance club anthems — just the thing for your next trip into a K-hole. “I’m a Sinner” and “Superstar” show a Cee Lo-style love for ’60s Day-Glo pop. They rate among her zippiest songs ever.

So many good tracks crowd the disc, in fact, that even the four extras on the deluxe version rate as must-owns.

The dance songs that dominate aren’t pushing mainstream club music ahead, as Madonna did on albums like “Erotica” or “Ray of Light.” But they’re in step with the most pleasurable tics and beats of now.

Some listeners will see the aftermath of Madonna’s divorce from Guy Ritchie reflected in the lyrics. But the four cuts that promise to be the most autobiographical contradict each other. Two strike an apologetic or regretful tone (“Best Friend” and “I F--ed Up,” both in the deluxe version). The other pair turn vindictive (“I Don’t Give A,” and “Love Spent”).

The only song that inescapably mines Madonna’s life for material — “I Don’t Give A” — reads as too literal and, so, self-indulgent. Worse, it suffers from a draggy melody. The song gossip-lovers may most wish were about her ex — “Gang Bang,” in which she imagines not just gunning a boyfriend down but chasing him into hell to do it again — is a hoot. It’s also historic. It may be the world’s first murder-ballad-as-disco song.

Better, the piece references Cher’s zippy ’60s hit “Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down).” Couple that with a reference to “The Beat Goes On” in “B-Day Song,” plus Madonna’s queenly getup at this year’s Super Bowl, and it seems as if the star has, at last, fulfilled a goal many of us have long held for her: She’s becoming Cher.

Still, the album’s greater feat has a far more subversive, if not superhuman, dimension. It finds Madonna aging in the most nose-thumbing way possible — in reverse

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/music-arts/mdna-madonna-great-cd-exhilarating-return-pop-dance-article-1.1048414#ixzz1q7x2KTUZ

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"i am fucking obsessed with the album and i'm finding sleep difficult." stamp that on the front of the effin cd.

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Five stars! Go NY Daily News!

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i still cannot believe rollingstone gave it only 3.5 stars!

and ew gave it a B- only!

it's her very very best CD IMHO

i much prefer it to confessions and ray of light.

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Guest groovyguy

"i am fucking obsessed with the album and i'm finding sleep difficult." stamp that on the front of the effin cd.

Strange but every morning I wake up with a different track playing in my head. I confess. I'm so addicted to MDNA.

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Guest HaveASit

Any answer from Metacritic?

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Any answer from Metacritic?

No response to my email. Not that I expect one.

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i still cannot believe rollingstone gave it only 3.5 stars!

and ew gave it a B- only!

it's her very very best CD IMHO

i much prefer it to confessions and ray of light.

good u dont know about some countries in europe ;) im telling you, theyre tired of club/dance music. or at least from madonna. cuz u can bet they'd give her more if she was from scandinavia ;)

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MDNA,' Madonna's great new CD, is an exhilarating return to her pop-dance past

Album is loaded with upbeat songs like 'Give Me All Your Luvin' ' and 'Superstar'

Powered by Inform

Madonna by Mert + Marcus.

5 STARS

The 53-year-old superstar turns back the clock on her latest disc.

On her latest CD, Madonna chirps through a rash of odes to puppy love, blows out the biggest bubblegum song of her career (“Give Me All Your Luvin’”), and corrals the whole disc under a title that cheekily refers to a hallucinogenic drug.

Do these sound like the moves of a 53-year-old mother of four to you?

In fact, much of “MDNA” — out Tuesday — has more the flip zip of a disc by Katy Perry or Ke$ha than something by a woman who may be older than both their mothers. Then again, we are talking about Madonna, a woman who, at this point, seems just as hellbent on giving the finger to expectations about age that she once gave to assumptions about sex.

That stance alone might be enough to give Madonna’s youthful channelings a sense of defiance rather than desperation. But the music itself is what makes her flagrant act of regression not embarrassing but both pointed and exciting.

“MDNA” expands on the best elements of Madonna’s last CD, 2008’s “Hard Candy,” her most easily embraced disc since her very first. For “Candy,” the singer abandoned her least attractive feature — her self-importance. Finally, Madonna stopped marring her albums with songs meant to educate us about starving children, world politics or (gag) spiritual growth. Instead, she gave fans what they wanted all along: pitched dance anthems that doubled as smart pop songs.

Once again, upbeat tracks dominate “MDNA.” The sole ballad, the droopy “Masterpiece,” comes from another source: the soundtrack to the Madonna-directed bomb of a film “W.E.” Better, Maddy has ditched that post-“Evita”/post-elocution-lessons voice to sing again like either a snotty or an ironically innocent imp. In “Turn Up the Radio,” she sounds blissfully infantile. In “Girl Gone Wild,” she plays teen bad girl with nutty verisimilitude.

It helps that the songs themselves have so much snap coursing through them. “I’m Addicted” and “Some Girls” have the dark disco élan of druggier dance club anthems — just the thing for your next trip into a K-hole. “I’m a Sinner” and “Superstar” show a Cee Lo-style love for ’60s Day-Glo pop. They rate among her zippiest songs ever.

So many good tracks crowd the disc, in fact, that even the four extras on the deluxe version rate as must-owns.

The dance songs that dominate aren’t pushing mainstream club music ahead, as Madonna did on albums like “Erotica” or “Ray of Light.” But they’re in step with the most pleasurable tics and beats of now.

Some listeners will see the aftermath of Madonna’s divorce from Guy Ritchie reflected in the lyrics. But the four cuts that promise to be the most autobiographical contradict each other. Two strike an apologetic or regretful tone (“Best Friend” and “I F--ed Up,” both in the deluxe version). The other pair turn vindictive (“I Don’t Give A,” and “Love Spent”).

The only song that inescapably mines Madonna’s life for material — “I Don’t Give A” — reads as too literal and, so, self-indulgent. Worse, it suffers from a draggy melody. The song gossip-lovers may most wish were about her ex — “Gang Bang,” in which she imagines not just gunning a boyfriend down but chasing him into hell to do it again — is a hoot. It’s also historic. It may be the world’s first murder-ballad-as-disco song.

Better, the piece references Cher’s zippy ’60s hit “Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down).” Couple that with a reference to “The Beat Goes On” in “B-Day Song,” plus Madonna’s queenly getup at this year’s Super Bowl, and it seems as if the star has, at last, fulfilled a goal many of us have long held for her: She’s becoming Cher.

Still, the album’s greater feat has a far more subversive, if not superhuman, dimension. It finds Madonna aging in the most nose-thumbing way possible — in reverse

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/music-arts/mdna-madonna-great-cd-exhilarating-return-pop-dance-article-1.1048414#ixzz1q7x2KTUZ

wow! :bow:

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She's becoming Cher????? wtf????

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Guest groovyguy

http://www.nu.nl/cd-recensies/2770724/madonna--mdna.html

Madonna – MDNA

Dutch Review

4/5 Star

Google Translate

Madonna may be the Queen Of Pop, the last year put potential successors as Lady Gaga, Rihanna and Kesha the tone in the field of danceable pop. Waving her scepter Madonna demands the dance floor.

It took over 47 months since Madonna's previous achievement, Hard Candy, out April 2008. Madonna never let her fans wait so long on a new album. Where Hard Candy was largely produced hip-hop producers like Timbaland, The Neptunes, Justin Timberlake, she is here in the sea with DJs and dance producers.

Benny Benassi (from the hit Satisfaction), Martin Solveig (from the hit Hello) and veteran William Orbit (for completeness hit: Barber's Adagio For Strings) are the main buttons turners and sliding tractors MDNA, the twelfth album by Madonna.

Hard Candy was very much in line with the significantly weaker Madonna albums Music (2000) and American Life (2003), MDNA but is rather a continuation of the fresh by disco-inspired dance sound of Confessions On A Dancefloor in 2005. The songs are clearly more focused on the dance floor than on the radio.

Flattering

Thus, the second song Gang Bang a delicious dark house number, like a Donna Summer snorted trying to rap over a raised Neue Welle-plate or Grauzone Rheingold. That may sound little flattering (and that's definitely not), but it does damn good song.

The only downside of Gang Bang is that it takes about a half minute long time, with a ludicrous finale (which Maddie the now famous words "If you act like a bitch, you die like a bitch" speaks). The fine, by Benny Benassie twisted I'm Addicted successor makes slip more than good.

Starting point

Benassie and his Swedish colleague Klas Ahlund (Robyn, Kesha, Sugababes) clearly take the nightclubs as a starting point, witness the construction of such numbers, while Solveigs songs (Turn Up The Radio, Give Me All Your Luvin 'I Do not Give A ) clearly modeled on his recent chart success with Dragonette.

Nicki Minaj and M.I.A. prove otherwise excellent substitutes for Dragonette. With Superstar Madonna seems (especially melody is concerned) to refer to ABBA and the playful I'm A Sinner combines elements of disco gospel. Spent Love sounds like Hung Up minus the sample from Gimme, Gimme, Gimme (A Man After Midnight).

Synthetic

Ballad Synthpop Masterpiece does not honor his name and belongs to the lesser contributions to MDNA. The dark, synthetic orchestrated finale Falling Free seems a relic of the nineties, but a nice finale. The Deluxe Edition includes five bonus tracks, including Beautiful Killer and B-Day Song worthwhile.

It's good to see that Madonna the weaker spots of her career mostly by clearing brush with a good follow plate. MDNA does so amply and justly Madonna's best work since Ray Of Light in 1998. Nicki Minaj therefore rightly proclaims: "The queen is still Madonna!"

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So basically getting the best overall reviews of her career, just about!!!! Still waiting on the sure to be amazing Q review!

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http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/music-arts/madonna-album-album-great-article-1.1048449

Madonna’s albums, excluding compilations, remixes, live DVDs and most soundtracks:

1) “Madonna” (released July 27, 1983)

4 Stars

A startling debut, combining dance classics (“Holiday”), fine-boned pop songs (“Lucky Star”) and even a flat-out rocker (“Burning Up”).

2) “Like a Virgin” (Nov. 12, 1984)

5 Stars

A far richer sound deepened Madonna on this disc, thanks to producer Nile Rodgers. He brought added finesse to character pieces (“Like a Virgin,” “Material Girl”) as well as to prime pop songs (“Over and Over”). Interestingly, only the reissue version holds Madonna’s peerless dance cut “Into the Groove” (from “Desperately Seeking Susan”).

3) “True Blue” (June 30, 1986)

4 Stars

A giant leap ahead for the star: She branched out with Latin pop (“La Isla Bonita”) and grand balladry (“Live to Tell”). Madonna fleshed out things even further with the headline-grabbing abortion-themed piece “Papa Don’t Preach” and the plush video-vehicle “Open Your Heart.”

4) “Like a Prayer” (March 21, 1989)

4 Stars

Madonna created the most elaborate song of her career with the show-stopper of an opener (the gospel-pop title cut). But she nearly equaled it with the club anthem “Express Yourself” and the mock-’60s pop smash “Cherish.”

5) “Erotica” (Oct. 20, 1992)

3 Stars

So begins Madonna’s dark and stormy period. With “Erotica” the star bored deep into serious dance music to create her most underground, cohesive and subversive album. It follows that it’s also her most divisive.

6) “Bedtime Stories” (Oct. 25, 1994)

3 Stars

For this venture, the star got into the rap-era groove of ’90s R&B. But she managed to break that up with a sweeping ballad (“Take a Bow”) and a nod to Bjork’s avant-garde electronica (the title track).

7) “Evita” soundtrack (Nov. 12, 1996)

5 Stars

Madonna wiped the floor with every other previous Evita on the soundtrack to the movie. Why? Because she’s the only one who ever sang it from the inside, without feeling a need to comment on her character’s politics. It helped that, to Madonna, there’s probably nothing wrong with being a fascist pig. Technically, she sang the role with an unexpected poise and power. Apparently, those singing lessons really paid off. So did the striking string arrangements.

8) “Ray of Light” (March 3, 1998)

3 Stars

Madonna got enlightened on “Ray of Light” — for better and for worse. The disc may have come as sweet relief after the heaviness of her previous two, non-soundtrack releases. But that led to lots of preaching about the inner self and the like. Luckily, all this didn’t prevent the disc from containing one of the most dizzying dance songs of her career — the smashing title track.

9) “Music” (Sept. 19, 2000)

4 Stars

A sister to “Ray of Light,” “Music” took a lighter approach to Madonna’s heightened new self, resulting in the note-perfect title single. The song “Music” rates as her simplest and, so, most perfect, pop statement since “Holiday.” The disc also soared on the endless melody, and savvy feminism, of “What It Feels Like for a Girl.”

10) “American Life” (April 22, 2003)

2 Stars

Whoopsie. This rates as the only face-down pratfall of Madonna’s recorded career. It’s a preachy, strident mess. Most damning, it’s not hooky — except for that cool, flamenco-inflected Bond theme, “Die Another Day.”

11) “Confessions on a Dance Floor” (Nov. 11, 2005)

3 Stars

“Confessions” was supposed to return Madonna to the fun club self of her youth. But it didn’t make it all the way. It can still be preachy, or clumsy (like the song that rhymes New York with dork). Happily, the disc includes the blissful single “Hung Up,” fired by a groovy ABBA sample.

12) “Hard Candy” (April 19, 2008)

5 Stars

“Candy” was the album “Confessions” claimed to be. It’s a total dance floor rave-up, complete with nonstop smart melodies and beats. “4 Minutes,” a duet with Justin Timberlake, ranked as the coolest single of 2008.

13) “MDNA” (March 23, 2012)

5 Stars

On a roll, Madge upholds the tone of “Hard Candy” on the new disc, again delivering something fast, sweet and fun. More, she expands both her melodic palette and her ironic élan.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/music-arts/madonna-album-album-great-article-1.1048449#ixzz1q8rwibDm

i love how he gave MDNA 5 stars, but ranking hard candy and like a virgin above like a prayer and ray of light?!

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Hard Candy/Like A Virgin = 5 Stars

Like A Prayer = 4 Stars

Ray of Light = 3 Stars

American Life = 2 Stars

:electropop:

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I love Jim Farber! I think he is a proper loon lol. Seriously, though, that is the kind of mad props Madonna deserves. A couple of questionable star ratings aside, he is basically saying "her whole career rocks!"

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Hard Candy/Like A Virgin = 5 Stars

Like A Prayer = 4 Stars

Ray of Light = 3 Stars

American Life = 2 Stars

:electropop:

I'm DYING :lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao:

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San Francisco Chronicle Album review: Madonna, 'MDNA'

Anybody here subscribers of the San Francisco Chronicle? That's the only way we can read this review before Sunday

Here's the review.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2012/03/22/PKMV1NJUE0.DTL

It's really mean spirited and unfair. I think it was written by some Gaga loon since it ends saying this won't do in the age of Gaga. It starts off saying how bad her SuperBowl performance was and how she was huffing and puffing and how that lowered the expectations for the album. The writer loses all credibility there since everyone else loved the SB performance. I honestly don't think they even listened to the album, but were determined to hate on her. I thought the SF Chronicle was a respected paper. I'm surprised they would publish something like this with such a clear bias. But I don't want to dwell on the negativity too much since almost every other review was fantastic.

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http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/music-arts/madonna-album-album-great-article-1.1048449

5) “Erotica” (Oct. 20, 1992)

3 Stars

8) “Ray of Light” (March 3, 1998)

3 Stars

11) “Confessions on a Dance Floor” (Nov. 11, 2005)

3 Stars

12) “Hard Candy” (April 19, 2008)

5 Stars

:bruised:

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To vocalism.....

Seriously, how did you picture Madonna at age 53?? How she is right now is EXACTLY as I would expect her to be at this age. I know people got the impression that she had "mellowed" (which to an extent she obviously has) but let's face it, not that it WASN'T obvious then, but MDNA confirms....she was TRYING HARD to be "good" with Guy. Losing herself in some ways in the process. Minus those years with him, this is pretty much how Madonna has always been. I just don't think it's cool at all that she gets the criticism she gets for being herself. Sure we will probably be hard pressed to find 53 year olds in our day to day life that like to dress in leather pants, poof their dyed blonde hair up, date 24 year olds and pop their pussy every chance they get but those things from Madonna at 53 just don't seem unusual to me AT ALL. In fact, Madonna shooting birds, drinking in pubs, wearing tweed, hanging out with the chickens on the farm seemed a bit try hard and not genuine to me, which is what a lot of people have been accusing her of being these past couple years she's brought the "sexy" back in her image.

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Guest Coked Up Baby Boy
Hard Candy/Like A Virgin = 5 Stars

Ray of Light = 3 Stars

American Life = 2 Stars

Fucking Christ on a cross.

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