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  1. So now some rich stupid people from Sylicon Valley and such consider untreated water as rich and alive instead of the treated one. It is the dangerous new fashion, along milk untreated. I just can't with stupidity. Food-safety expert warns latest bizarre Silicon Valley $60 'raw water' trend could quickly turn deadly Kate Taylor Silicon Valley is developing an obsession with untreated, unfiltered water, according to The New York Times. But a food-poisoning expert says that the trend is dangerous and could be deadly. "Raw" water can spread bacteria and diseases including cholera, E. coli, Hepatitis A, and Giardia. When food-safety expert Bill Marler saw The New York Times' trend piece on Silicon Valley's recent obsession with raw water, he thought he was reading a headline from The Onion. According to The Times, demand for unfiltered water is skyrocketing as tech-industry insiders develop a taste for water that hasn't been treated, to prevent the spread of bacteria or other contaminants. In San Francisco, "unfiltered, untreated, unsterilized spring water" is selling for as much as $60.99 for a 2.5 gallon jug. Startups dedicated to untreated water are popping up. People — including startup Juicero's cofounder Doug Evans — are gathering gallons of untreated water from natural springs to bring to Burning Man. Tourmaline Spring sells an untreated water as "sacred, living water."Tourmaline Spring While Evans and other fans say raw water is perfect for those who are "extreme about health," Marler — a food-safety advocate and a lawyer — says the opposite is true. "Almost everything conceivable that can make you sick can be found in water," Marler told Business Insider. Unfiltered, untreated water, even from the cleanest streams, can contain animal feces, spreading Giardia, which has symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea and results in roughly 4,600 hospitalizations a year. Hepatitis A, which resulted in 20 deaths in a California outbreak in 2017, can be spread through water if it isn't treated. E. coli, and cholera can also be transmitted via untreated water. Because filtered, treated water has become the norm, Marler says, most people don't realize how dangerous s0-called raw water can be. "The diseases that killed our great-grandparents were completely forgotten about," he said. Most Americans don't personally know anyone who died of Hepatitis A or cholera, thanks to advances in technology and more stringent safety standards. As a result, they had a hard time realizing the risks involved in consuming untreated water. "It's fine till some 10-year-old girl dies a horrible death from cholera in Montecito, California," Marler said. On January 2, Business Insider's Melia Robinson visited a San Francisco supermarket where a small company called Live Water sells its untreated water. Rainbow Grocery was sold out of the Fountain of Truth Spring Water from Live Water, but a sign indicated a "slight price increase." An empty container sits on a shelf in Rainbow Grocery, where Live Water is sold.Melia Robinson/Business Insider Rainbow Grocery is expecting a new shipment of Live Water on January 4.Melia Robinson/Business Insider The New York Times reported last week that Rainbow Grocery, a co-op in the city's Mission District, was selling a 2.5-gallon jug of the product from the startup Live Water for $36.99. As of Tuesday, the same jug costs $38.49 due to Live Water raising its prices. The co-op also sells a decorative jug for Live Water for $60.99. Melia Robinson/Business Insider According to Marler, the raw-water trend is similar to people's obsession with raw milk or opposition to vaccines. While they lack scientific evidence, they're convinced that they are correct, in part because they have failed to see the repercussions of life without scientific advances. "You can't stop consenting adults from being stupid," Marler said. "But we should at least try." Melia Robinson contributed reporting.
  2. http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/NY-Zoo-Livestreams-Pregnant-Giraffe-Ahead-of-Birth-of-Baby-Calf-414586083.html NY Zoo's Pregnant Giraffe Livestream Pulled From YouTube After Activists Complain of 'Nudity and Sexual Content,' Then Restored Amid Public Outcry By Jennifer Millman YouTube has apparently restored an upstate New York zoo's livestream of a giraffe preparing to give birth that had been abruptly suspended Thursday after animal activists complained about "nudity and sexual content" in violation of the site's policy. More than 20 million had been viewing the cam, placed in the stall of “April” the giraffe at the Animal Adventure Park in Harpursville, in anticipation of the birth of her fourth calf. People from all over the world watched the long-necked animal slink gracefully around her hay-laden home, giddy with excitement. Suddenly, shortly before 8 a.m., the stream stopped. The Animal Adventure Park posted on Facebook that YouTube yanked the stream for "nudity & sexual content" and said "Animal Rights Extremists" were responsible. The post was shared more than 6,200 times within an hour as thousands of commenters voiced frustration over "the miracle of life" being banned from YouTube. At least one person suggested the zoo put clothes on the giraffe. In a Facebook live addressing the controversy, the zoo's owner, Jordan Patch, said, "This is a perfect example of why we cannot have nice things." Patch said it's OK that some animal activists don't agree with the zoo's decision to stream the birth, but that they were wrong to get YouTube to pull it. "This has pulled an educational tool away from tens of millions of individuals," he said. A two-hour stream documenting part of the giraffe's labor was allowed to remain online, though the comment section was rife with angry users demanding YouTube restore the live video. By 9:45 a.m., it was back up. YouTube didn't directly respond to the controversy, but clearly delineated policies on its site ask users to flag content they believe violates standards. The site has an appeals process in place for users, and if content is removed in error, YouTube works quickly to reinstate it. Giraffes are pregnant for 15 months. Labor will last anywhere from a few hours to a few days. The calf will be about 150 pounds and 6 feet tall at birth and up and walking in about an hour. The zoo says it will hold a contest to name the calf. Though it'll be 15-year-old April's fourth calf, it'll be a first for 5-year-old dad Oliver, the zoo says.
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