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XXL

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About XXL

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    Milan
  • Favorite Madonna Song
    Die Another Day

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  1. Substitute Dump with USA governments/CIA and you have a more accurate picture. What you have described and the feudalism mechanisms that tie other Western countries to the US is a broader American Foreign Policy issue, not just a Trump one. The US knows China is threatening to end its economic and energy resources monopoly on the world, it just all stems from that That doesn't mean that China isn't an autocracy of course but the way US governments and its secret service agencies run the world is not any less murderous, corrupt and based on sheer lies, irregardless of what the UN has to say, in fact the UN have become a mere decoration of what was once supposed to be the voice of the ENTIRE world. Not the US and Israel's puppet That we are even having this conversation is astounding, the West is in the wrong just as much as China and Russia are You cannot be an ally and sponsor of Saudi Arabia and reclaim some sort of sainthood for yourself. Saudi Arabia, the mother of Al Qaeda and ISIS But yes keep playing tricks to save an (imposed) reserve currency ($) that's doomed to collapse regardless. Fact is that the US doesn't want Europe to tie any relation with the rising East. They use the same pathetic tactics they've used in South America for decades. "You're either with us or you're dead" Anyway, anybody who voted Brexit voted for more of the above, wittingly or unwittingly, i.e more bullying from the United States of America, Trump or not From food poisoning and allowing carcinogenic crap like Monsanto to invade European tables to more acts of violent military aggression
  2. I see You did what you felt was best for you at the time
  3. A cargo ship keeps trade going during the Covid-19 lockdown. The government is preparing to complete a trade deal with the US that will hit food standards and British farmers
  4. Covid is getting the headlines, but a trade agreement with the US is fast taking shape. And it does not look like a good deal, says FRANCIS BECKETT. https://www.theneweuropean.co.uk/top-stories/donald-trump-us-trade-deal-with-uk-1-6689064 Britain is being fattened up for a trade deal with Donald Trump designed to strengthen his chances of re-election in November. The latest move is the Agriculture Bill, which has passed all its stages in the House of Commons and is due for its second reading in the House of Lords on June 10, and which effectively removes both food standard safeguards and protections for British farmers. Its significance lies, not in what it says, but in what it does not say. The most important farming legislation in generations, it was the opportunity to replace EU food safety standards and protections for rural industries with a home-grown version. Neil Parish, Conservative MP for Tiverton and Honiton, tabled an amendment to protect UK farmers from low-standard food imports. It would have prevented future trade deals from allowing food into the UK which was not produced to the standards required of our own producers. The government ensured its defeat by 328 to 277 votes. Parish could muster only 22 Conservative colleagues to vote for it. And only one brave Conservative MP – Helen Grant, MP for Maidstone and the Weald – voted against the unamended Bill. Conservatives with rural constituencies, who have previously expressed serious concerns about the Bill, fell into line. A former Ulster Unionist MEP, Jim Nicholson, says it is potentially “the last nail in the coffin for agriculture in Northern Ireland” because “it opens the floodgates to cheap food imports into the UK from around the world. This food will not have been produced to the same standards achieved consistently by farmers in Northern Ireland.” This means, among other things, the famous chlorinated chicken. An RSPCA report explains: “The problem the EU has with chlorinated chicken is that antimicrobial treatments can be used to compensate for poor hygiene along the supply chain, particularly on farms for example. Ever since 1997, member states of the EU have refused to accept imports of chlorine-treated poultry and this has been a point of contention with the US. The EU maintains that chemical washes are a form of quick-fix covering up for lower treatment standards, including lower animal welfare standards.” US chickens are raised in such cramped conditions that the only way to stop them arriving on our dinner tables diseased is to dunk them in chlorine The government has pressed ahead despite opposition from all the food producers, including the British Poultry Council and even the National Farmers’ Union, normally a loyal Tory ally. “The most significant deficiency with the Bill is the absence of any commitment or means of upholding British farming production standards in the context of international trade negotiations” an NFU statement says. “The NFU believes that it would be futile to develop a comprehensive and ambitious domestic support policy, simply for UK farmers’ efforts to be undermined through the importation of products not produced to the same level of environmental or animal health/welfare standards expected of them domestically.” Farmers Weekly columnist Jacob Anthony puts it bluntly: “The fact that the majority of the people running this country are happy to use agriculture as a bargaining chip has left me and many other farmers furious.
  5. UK on track to become 51st state of America under Boris Johnson Francis Beckett’s article “We’re being fattened up for a one-way deal with Trump” was depressing enough, but added to Boris Johnson’s love for all things American, as quoted in his book Life in the Fast Lane, it becomes extremely alarming. There is no point in asking Boris to stand up for Britain as he would evidently be happy for the UK to become the 51st state of the union. A campaign as forceful as that which opposed TTIP (Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership) is needed urgently, and this time the UK won’t have partners in Europe to work with. Conversations with friends and letters to local media must give this wide exposure, as well as pressure on one’s own MP. The virus will eventually end but a trade deal with Trump’s US will change our politics and society forever. We must resist.
  6. I agree that there are forms of insidious, sneaky racism here. I was not stating that Europe is racism free I was trying to make a point about the drastic difference between the US and Europe, to have no accountability for police forces is not the same as living in a place that guarantees it. You cannot shoot unarmed black people and be sure to walk away scot free. Also in Europe you don't have that toxic firearm culture
  7. And for very specific historical reasons. That's why they work well together and occasionally team up on bogus brutal empire wars. On top of sponsoring one of the worst rogue states in the world. Saudi Arabia, a country that is de facto the incubator for ideological and material terrorism The governments, not necessarily the people, although obviously you can have large segments of the population who might be racist Racism and any feeling of hatred, any negative emotion or seeking to harm others for the sake of it can be found anywhere, it's part of the dark side of human nature. It is not based on nationality and casting stones is somewhat tricky because history teaches otherwise
  8. The point of marching is to highlight the racism present here too and there should be more marches of course but to say those Floyd marches over here in Europe are hypocritical because we don't march enough for other forms of racism it is wrong imo. And if you're disagreeing about the role of Italy welcoming people in during the past 25 years you're completely off the mark It started with the 90s Yougoslavia situation and continued with the destruction and subjugation of the Middle East sold to the Western masses under a false guise It was only in 2015 with the Syrian refugee situation that Northern European countries started to understand that it is not only something that needs to be dealt with by Southern European countries. And Merkel taking in 1m refugees etc
  9. Just a reminder Italy is the one country in Europe that has done the most to take in more refugees than any other country in Europe in the past 25 years, when in the mid 90s the Mediterranean Sea was being turned into a graveyard and of course Northern European countries were dead silent, to not even mention Britain that's always enjoyed keeping one foot in its former colony the US (while continuing to exploit all of its Commonwealth territories) and one foot in Europe, and we all know how that's ending up ... If Salvini did what he did it doesn't mean that Italy as a whole is massively racist, mind you the current prime minister was in government with Salvini and he enjoys good to great international approval ratings Also do please remember that many of those NGOs are involved in human trafficking and are involved with George Soros foundations who back in 1992 profited from the collapse of the London Stock Market by a one billion figure, so not exactly Santa Claus In any case this was not the issue being discussed here, the point WASN'T that instances of racism do not exist in Europe as well, but that in the US it's a broad daylight, cold blooded, weekly, almost legalised system and what armed forces can do there and are allowed to do there versus what they are actually allowed to get away with here
  10. This I'm speaking for Italy specifically now If a cop starts shooting in the street indiscriminately, for no reason, he or she will be arrested, prosecuted and go to jail. And it's vastly the case for most of Europe. Racism does exist EVERYWHERE duh John Wayne's weekly, state sponsored and totally unaccountable shoot out only happen somewhere else. There's a significant difference
  11. Totally I'm sorry but to say the US and Europe are on the same level of tolerated, state sponsored, unjustified violence is utterly false. Also, European leadership does not know an equivalent body to the NRA holding them perpetually hostage, with which they'd happy to do business with and take money from for electoral purposes
  12. Karbatal I disagree My premise wasn't at all that racism isn't present in Europe or that we don't have nationalist, populist or downright racist parties, I've said what's been going on on a regular basis in the US for years, i.e. unarmed black people being shot for no reason at all or teenagers armed to the teeth shooting down everyone they can hit in high schools it is absolutely not the norm. You can't compare shooting someone unarmed for "looking suspicious", and it's more often than not if they are black, to the examples you produced in the above post The police here have to abide by a certain code of conduct. In the US there's no code to begin with. Huge difference. Can you imagine here a policeman chocking someone to death in broad daylight and not being immediately arrested? With visual document of the crime to boot. Absolutely not. There are no comparisons to be made
  13. There you go Awful but definitely a possibility I cannot believe that after everything that's happened in the past five months alone between the arbitrary killing of that top Iranian military official, internationally condemned, then the global health scare and now his current handling of the George Floyd's case he still stands a chance at re-election Either way I have some sort of ominous feeling that, considered the radical split of the population between nutters and fanatics of all types who are emboldened by Trump's madness and the sane part of the population, whether Trump ends up winning or not, the US will be going down a long and tumultuous period of civil unrest. It's fucking scary and inexplicably bizarre when you think about all the progress made in the 20th century on many issues, yet here we are, 20 years into the new millennium and it's like we're heading over a century backwards
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