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XXL

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About XXL

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  • Birthday 02/06/1983

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    Like A Prayer

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  1. Breaking News A new draft Brexit deal has just been agreed between the UK and EU ahead of a meeting of EU leaders. But Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party is not happy with it
  2. Some people in England are still nostalgic about the Empire days or worse, still think it's the Empire days. After Thatcher and Blair's unsubtle deindustrialization efforts you take the UK out of the EU (which needs to be modified anyway, granted) and its "fictitious" third economy of the continent status thanks to the insurance, financial, property and service sector is reduced to sheer worthlessness. So the irony is double. From any perspective you look at this from, it's always the British political class that have brought this about on the country through the decades Besides, you cannot want access to the single market and its benefits but feel free to not want some of the obligations and downsides. Too fucking convenient
  3. Cannot believe it's been over three years we've been talking about this, sigh
  4. https://www.ft.com/content/5c2602b4-be63-11e9-b350-db00d509634e Boris Johnson has accused former chancellor Philip Hammond of undermining the government’s strategy with a “terrible collaboration” with the EU to thwart the UK’s departure from the bloc. During the first “People’s PMQs” — a Facebook Q&A where the prime minister answers questions from members of the public — the prime minister delivered a coded critique of MPs opposed to a no-deal Brexit, such as Mr Hammond, who have taken a public stand against his strategy. “There’s a terrible collaboration, as it were, going on between people who think they can block Brexit in parliament and our European friends,” Mr Johnson said.
  5. Philip Hammond, until recently Chancellor of the Exchequer "leaving the EU without a deal would be just as much a betrayal of the referendum result as not leaving at all" He has accused Boris Johnson of shutting down any hope of securing an agreement. But the prime minister’s team continues to argue that Britain must leave the EU by 31 October. https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/philip-hammond-to-say-that-people-voted-for-hard-brexit-simply-isnt-true-l82rhd3cm The new government took office three weeks ago, I and many of my like-minded colleagues have chosen to keep quiet and give the prime minister the time and space to set out his plan to deliver a Brexit deal. But now it is time to reiterate our support for Boris Johnson to deliver on his public and private commitments towards a deal and his assurance that no-deal is a “million-to-one” chance. The early signals are not encouraging. The move from demanding changes to the backstop to demanding its total removal is a pivot from a tough negotiating stance to a wrecking one
  6. The Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney said a no deal Brexit scenario would be an instantaneous shock not just to demand but to supply
  7. Passengers were shut out of some of the country’s busiest train stations during the Friday evening rush hour after large parts of England and Wales were left without electricity following a major power cut Transport chaos across England and Wales after major power cuts Transport and communications infrastructure, homes and businesses suffered power cuts this evening in large parts of the country. The National Grid said issues with two generators brought blackouts to London and the South east as well as the Midlands, the South West and Wales, the North East and North west of England too. They said the issue was 'now resolved'.
  8. Tesco to cut 4,500 jobs across 153 Metro stores https://www.bbc.com/news/business-49239916 Supermarket giant Tesco says about 4,500 staff in 153 Tesco Metro stores are set to lose their jobs in the latest round of redundancies. The UK's largest grocer said changes to the way the stores operated would "serve shoppers better" and help to "run our business more sustainably". It said the stores were operating in an increasingly competitive and challenging retail environment. Tesco boss Jason Tarry said the firm did not take the jobs decision lightly. 'Cost pressures' The company said the Metro format was originally designed for larger, weekly shops, but now nearly 70% of customers used them as convenience stores, buying food for that day. Tesco, which employs about 340,000 people in the UK and Republic of Ireland, said that changes to the stores would now include: "faster and simpler" ways of filling shelves, with fewer products stored in the back rooms and more stock going straight to the shop floor staff working "more flexibly" across the store to improve customer service at the busiest times of the day and in the right areas of the store "leaner" management structure. "In a challenging, evolving retail environment, with increasing cost pressures, we have to continue to review the way we run our stores to ensure we reflect the way our customers are shopping and do so in the most efficient way," Mr Tarry added. Tesco Metro shops are sized between Tesco superstores and Tesco Express shops. They first opened in 1994. Tesco raises prices on 1,000 products. Tesco profits jump in uncertain market. Tesco counter cost cuts to hit 9,000 jobs. It is also making some changes in 134 of its 1,750 Express stores, where customer footfall is lower. Changes in those stores will include "a slight reduction in opening hours during quieter trading periods at the start and end of the day, and simplifying stock routines". Tesco is in the midst of trying to save £1.5bn as the competition between supermarkets intensifies. It comes as German budget rivals Aldi and Lidl continue to put pressure on the big four supermarkets. In January, Tesco announced it would close food counters in 90 of its stores as part of a wider cost-cutting plan that would affect 9,000 staff. Tesco said then that its remaining fish, meat and deli counters in 700 stores would be run on a full-time or flexible basis. It has also opened a discount chain, Jack's, to take on its German rivals.
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