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justinian

Elitists
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About justinian

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    Brussels
  • Favorite Madonna Song
    You'll see

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  1. "Much of sex is politics, after all. Or maybe it’s the other way around" . https://www.yahoo.com/style/model-wearing-american-flag-hijab-magazine-cover-shows-underboob-162900883.html
  2. ^^^my bet to da da da da david bowie...in case she's really homaging to somebody
  3. The 10 Happiest Countries On Earth Amy CapettaApril 24, 2015 The results are in from the World Happiness Report. (Photo: Getty Images) Which country is happiest? Maybe we shouldn’t be surprised that it’s the one that eats the most chocolate. The results of this year’s World Happiness Report are in — and Switzerland scored the top spot in the ranking. The report is based on data from 158 countries with regard to six factors: GDP per capita, absence of corruption, generosity, social support, freedom, and healthy life expectancy. The report was released by the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network. The 10 happiest countries were found mostly in Europe: Switzerland Iceland Denmark Norway Canada Finland The Netherlands Sweden New Zealand Australia And for a more global look at the happiest countries, check out this map from the report: The darker and greener the color, the higher the country ranked in the happiness report. (World Happiness Report) Similar to the previous reports, the happiness factor was judged on a scale from 0 to 10, where the average global number totaled 5.1. Switzerland, for instance, had a number of 7.587, while the U.S. — which came in at No. 15 in the ranking — had a 7.119. (The U.S. ranked 11th in 2012.) Related: And The Happiest State In America Is… Out of all the countries included in the ranking, Togo came in last. The bottom 10 countries in the ranking are: Togo (Ranked last) Burundi Syria Benin Rwanda Afghanistan Burkina Faso Ivory Coast Guinea Chad The authors of the report noted that a few common sources of true contentment among the happiest countries were the ability to trust those in your neighborhood, as well as those in a government position. Another marker: being surrounded by people who show empathy for others (which can be shown by random acts of kindness, such as volunteering in a local charity or returning a lost wallet). “As the science of happiness advances, we are getting to the heart of what factors define quality of life for citizens,” John F. Helliwell, a professor from the University of British Columbia and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and a co-editor for the report, said in a statement. “We are encouraged that more and more governments around the world are listening and responding with policies that put well-being first. Countries with strong social and institutional capital not only support greater well-being, but are more resilient to social and economic crises.”
  4. WHAT'S THIS Four Swedish cops got more than they bargained for while visiting New York. The blonde-haired bunch, who look more like Scandinavian models than police officers, were headed to see a Broadway show on Wednesday evening when a fight broke out on their train. They stepped in to put their professional skills to use before the New York Police Department arrived. TWO MEN WERE GRAPPLING ON THE SUBWAY FLOOR OF A NORTHBOUND 6 TRAIN, WHEN A SUBWAY CONDUCTOR STOPPED THE TRAIN AND CALLED FOR HELP, ACCORDING TO LOCAL REPORTS. THE QUICK-THINKING SWEDES SEPARATED THEM AND PINNED ONE MAN, WHO ALLEGEDLY INSTIGATED THE FIGHT, TO THE GROUND UNTIL HELP ARRIVED. The foursome, Samuel Kvarzell, Markus Asberg, Eric Jansberger and Erik Naslund, then asked both men involved in the altercation to remain calm (see above video). One of the men was badly injured and bleeding. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dDAB35SYIr0#t=56 Asberg said the group's main priority was safety. "They were lying on the floor, one on top of the other," he told DNAinfo. "We got to make sure that nobody gets hurt. Try to calm them down without hurting them. Asberg added that he and his colleagues had been in New York City for one day, and were on vacation. “We’re no heroes, just tourists,” he told the New York Post. The men said they were just doing their job. “It was pretty routine,” Jansberger said. “We came just to make sure no one got hurt.”
  5. Madonna and Taylor Swift’s Joint Performance Was the Best Sort of Collaboration Daniel D’Addario @DPD_ 11:15 AM ET At the iHeartRadio Music Awards, the two superstars teamed up to thrilling effect Last night, Madonna acted out one of her best-known recent tricks: Enlisting a younger performer to grant her music some extra currency. In a televised performance of her new single “Ghosttown,” the performer was supported by Taylor Swift on guitar. It was the most memorable moment from the iHeartRadio Music Awards (whatever those may be) and of Madonna’s recent promotional campaign for her new album. Though the star is often criticized for her work with younger artists, her performance with Swift was, in fact, the very best sort of collaboration. Madonna’s past few years have seen her, probably more often than is flattering, team up with stars of more recent vintage; her 2012 Super Bowl halftime show was ceded in large part to flavor-of-the-minute band LMFAO and bird-flipping scene-stealer M.I.A., while her appearance on Miley Cyrus’s MTV Unplugged taping felt undercooked. And some of Madonna’s earnest attempts to explore what’s hip out there, from her EDM-inflected 2012 album MDNA to her asking Miley Cyrus to introduce her at the Grammys as “our b—,” have seemed embarrassingly out-of-touch. But criticisms of Madonna for working with younger artists tend to skip over the particulars of the collaborations right to broad-brush condemnation of a woman over 40 trying to stay contemporary. It’s been that way since Madonna’s performance with Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera at the 2003 Video Music Awards, a brilliant piece of stagecraft that effectively anointed Spears and Aguilera as Madonna’s successors. A musical generation later, Madonna chose the perfect collaborator for a country-tinged pop anthem about heartbreak. And Swift, lost in the music, seemed legitimately excited to be onstage with Madonna: Why shouldn’t she be? Madonna’s ability to reinvent her sound and her image has provided precedent for any number of pop stars, including one who recent switched genres entirely. Perhaps the issue, among those who critique Madonna’s work with a younger cohort, is one of framing. Madonna is subjected to all the same criticisms as a pop star under 30, “desperation” and a perpetually oscillating level of “relevance” chief among them. When Paul McCartney, by contrast, performs with stars like Rihanna and Kanye West, it’s not a sign of his desperation to stay hip, because he’s a legacy artist perceived as earnestly interested in what’s out there these days. Where’s the same generosity of spirit when it comes to Madonna? When her album Rebel Heart missed the number-one spot on the Billboard charts (and her heavily promoted first single, “Living for Love,” missed the charts entirely), the schadenfreude was thick in the air, despite the fact that it’s no one’s baseline expectation that a new album by McCartney, or Prince, or Mick Jagger, would automatically become a hit. Madonna’s fame, though, has always been tied to a snooty assumption that her music is more popular than good, and thus it only matters if it’s popular. But maybe it’s time to give her her due as an artist, not just a hit machine. Madonna has entered a phase of her career where statistics don’t necessarily matter, but where cementing her legacy absolutely does. Rebel Heart exists not to become a top-selling album but to prove she has a place in today’s pop-music ecosystem; not every one of its, or Madonna’s, attempts to prove contemporary savvy come across perfectly, but in general, the fact that we’re paying attention at all proves a point. Given Swift’s obvious willingness to perform with Madonna, and the degree to which their collaboration worked, the point seems made. http://time.com/3763290/madonna-taylor-swift-iheartradio-ghost-town/
  6. perhaps in some kind of future there won't be anything too complicated to be understood, to be stated...a blandworld...a ghostworld...where computers will do everything; but I am wondering who will then, do the computers?!
  7. Finland wants to abandon teaching subjects at school Finland already has one of the best school education systems. It always ranks near the top in mathematics, reading, and science in the prestigious PISA rankings (the 2012 list, pdf) by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Teachers in other countries flock to its schools to learn from a country that is routinely praised as just a really, really wonderful place to live. But the country is not resting on its laurels. Finland is considering its most radical overhaul of basic education yet—abandoning teaching by subject for teaching by phenomenon. Traditional lessons such as English Literature and Physics are already being phased out among 16-year-olds in schools in Helsinki. Instead, the Finns are teaching phenomena—such as the European Union, which encompasses learning languages, history, politics, and geography. No more of an hour of history followed by an hour of chemistry. The idea aims to eliminate one of the biggest gripes of students everywhere: “What is the point of learning this?” Now, each subject is anchored to the reason for learning it. Pasi Silander, Helsinki’s development manager, says the world has changed with the spread of technology and many of the old ways of teaching have no practical purpose. “Young people use quite advanced computers,” he told the Independent. “In the past the banks had lots of bank clerks totting up figures but now that has totally changed.” Many teachers in Finland, many of whom have been teaching single subjects their whole careers, oppose the changes. It is not hard to see why. The new system is much more collaborative, forcing teachers from different areas to come up with the curriculum together. Marjo Kyllonen, Helsinki’s education manager and the person responsible for reforming the system in the capital, calls this “co-teaching” and teachers who agree to it get a small bonus on top of their salaries. Kyllonen told the Independent: “There are schools that are teaching in the old fashioned way which was of benefit in the beginnings of the 1900s—but the needs are not the same and we need something fit for the 21st century.” Later this month, she is proposing that the new system is rolled out across the whole country by 2020. Will the rest of the world follow the Finns’ lead?
  8. she should do something...a video...a (live) performance.... with him of "inside out"
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